Frankenstein: The Consequence of Creation

New Review

Famous as a horror story, as the first science fiction novel, Frankenstein is also a tale of ambition, a warning about unbridled science, and responsibility for actions. Readers consider what the tale says of the consequences of creation in a detailed lesson from the Great American Read collection. As an extension activity class members research a modern technological creation and consider the obligations or responsibilities the creators have for their works.

3 Views 2 Downloads
CCSS: Designed
Instructional Ideas

  • Have groups create a Venn diagram noting the parallels among the novel, the myth of Prometheus, and the epigraph from Paradise Lost
  • Assign the essential question as homework prior to the lesson
  • Ask groups to draw comparisons among American literature's science-obsessed villains Ethan Brand, Roger Chillingworth, and Dr. Heidegger
Classroom Considerations

  • Presumes pupils have read the novel
  • One of five PBS Frankenstein resources


  • This resource is only available on an unencrypted HTTP website. It should be fine for general use, but don’t use it to share any personally identifiable information
Pros

  • The lesson plan is carefully scaffolded
  • Links to Project Gutenberg's e-text of the novel and to A Great American Read video are provided
Cons

  • None