Reading to Write

Silly journal and essay prompts may be fun to write, but they don't model the kind of writing needed for college papers and standardized tests. The 15th part in a series of 24 covers the concept of reading to write—during and after reading strategies to help create an effective response to a text. Advice includes tips such as taking notes while reading, scheduling when to write the paper, and sharing a draft with a friend.

9 Views 8 Downloads
CCSS: Adaptable
Instructional Ideas

  • Pick a reading strategy, such as identifying the genre, and practice using it as a whole class
  • Give a writing assignment based on a text and go through the process of completing the assignment step by step with scholars
Classroom Considerations

  • Share with learners digitally, so they can access at any time during the process
Pros

  • Easy to skim thanks to bullet points and bold font
  • Promotes reflection on before, during, and after the writing process
Cons

  • Contains limited tips during the actual writing process and focuses on less effective tips, such as writing a draft a few days before a paper is due
Common Core