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Kindergarten

Arts Education

Dance: Movement Elements and Dance Skills: Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and dance skills.

Dance: Choreography: Students will create movement compositions based on choreographic principles, processes, and forms.

Dance: Dance as Expression: Students will demonstrate an understanding of dance as a way to express and communicate meaning.

Dance: Performance in Dance: Students will rehearse and stage dance works.

Dance: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own dances and the dances of others using appropriate dance vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Music: Singing: Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Reading and Notation: Students will read music written in standard notation.

Music: Playing Instruments: Students will play instruments, alone and with others, to perform a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvisation and Composition: Students will improvise, compose, and arrange music.

Music: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own music and the music of others using appropriate music vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Theatre: Acting: Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes.

Theatre: Reading and Writing Scripts: Students will read, analyze, and write dramatic material.

Theatre: Directing: Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works.

Theatre: Technical Theatre: Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production.

Theatre: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own theatrical work and the work of others using appropriate theatre vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Visual Arts: Methods, Materials, and Techniques: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Visual Arts: Elements and Principles of Design: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression: Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

Visual Arts: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

Visual Arts: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Connections: Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, where appropriate, interpret their meanings.

Connections: Roles of Artists in Communities: Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Connections: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of style, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Connections: Inventions, Technologies, and the Arts: Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their works.

Connections: Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will use knowledge of the arts and cultural resources in the study of the arts, English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Health and PE

Growth and Development: Students will learn the basic characteristics of physical growth and development, including body functions and systems throughout the life cycle, and will acquire skills to promote and maintain positive growth and development.

Physical Activity and Fitness: Students will, by repeated practice, acquire and refine a variety of manipulative, locomotor, and non-locomotor movement skills, and will utilize principles of training and conditioning, will learn biomechanics and exercise physiology, and will apply the concept of wellness to their lives.

Nutrition: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Reproduction/Sexuality: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make effective personal decisions that promote their emotional, sexual, and reproductive health.

Mental Health: Students will acquire knowledge about emotions and physical health, the management of emotions, personality and character development, and social awareness; and will learn skills to promote self-acceptance, make decisions, and cope with stress, including suicide prevention.

Family Life: Students will gain knowledge about the significance of the family on individuals and society, and will learn skills to support the family, balance work and family life, be an effective parent, and nurture the development of children.

Interpersonal Relationships: Students will learn that relationships with others are an integral part of the human life experience and the factors that contribute to healthy interpersonal relationships, and will acquire skills to enhance and make many of these relationships more fulfilling through commitment and communication.

Disease Prevention and Control: Students will learn the signs, causes, and treatment of chronic and communicable diseases, and will gain skills related to health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to administer first aid and carry out emergency procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, will avoid, recognize, and report verbal, physical, and emotional abuse situations, and will assess the factors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injury, including motor vehicle accidents, fire safety, and weapons safety.

Tobacco, Alcohol, & Substance Use/Abuse Prevention: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be competent in making health-enhancing decisions regarding the use of medications and avoidance of substances, and in communicating about substance use/abuse prevention for healthier homes, schools, and communities.

Violence Prevention: Students will learn how their actions affect others, will understand the power that positive character traits can have in violence prevention, will gain skills to report incidents of violence and hurtful behavior to adults in the school and community, will avoid engaging in violence, and will identify constructive alternatives to violence, including how to discourage others from engaging in violence.

Consumer Health and Resource Management: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain, manage, and evaluate resources to maintain physical and mental health and well being for themselves, their family, and the community.

Ecological Health: Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Community and Public Health: Students will learn the influence of social factors on health, the contribution of public health, and will gain skills to promote health and to collaborate with others to facilitate healthy, safe, and supportive communities.

World Languages

Communication: Interpersonal Communication: Students of modern languages will converse in a language other than English to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students of classical languages will engage in simple oral exchanges and will develop reading skills with discussions of texts conducted in English.

Communication: Interpretive Communication: Students will understand and interpret ideas and information written or spoken in a language other than English. In classical language study, discussion will be conducted in English.

Communication: Presentational Communication: Students of modern languages will write and speak in a language other than English to present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics. Presentations in classical language classes will usually take the form of speaking or writing in English.

Cultures: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the traditions, perspectives, practices, and products of the culture studied, including human commonalities as reflected in history, literature, and the visual and performing arts. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Linguistic Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparison of the language studied with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Cultural Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparison of the target culture with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Connections: Students of modern and classical languages will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge of other disciplines and to acquire new information and knowledge. In classical language study, discussion and presentations will be in English.

Communities: Students will use languages other than English within and beyond the school setting. Students of classical languages will recognize elements of classical languages and ancient cultures in the world around them, and they will share insights derived from their study of classical languages with others within and beyond the classroom setting.

Science

Kindergarten: Earth and Space Sciences

Kindergarten: Life Science

Kindergarten: Physical Science

Mathematics

Mathematical Practice

Counting and Cardinality

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Measurement and Data

Geometry

Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Kindergarten Reading Standards for Literature [RL]

Kindergarten Reading Standards for Informational Text [RI]

Kindergarten Reading Standards for Foundational Skills [RF]

Kindergarten Writing Standards [W]

Kindergarten Speaking and Listening Standards [SL]

Kindergarten Language Standards [L]

Technology Education

Kindergarten – Grade 2: Computing and Society (CAS)

Kindergarten – Grade 2: Digital Tools and Collaboration (DTC)

Kindergarten-Grade 2: Computing Systems (CS)

Kindergarten – Grade 2: Computational Thinking (CT)

Social Studies

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

2

Develop focused questions or problem statements and conduct inquiries. The ability to develop focused research questions in history/social science or define the dimensions of a particular policy problem is central to learning in these disciplines. Students learn that each field in the social sciences has its own ways of defining questions. For example, in studying the Great Depression, A political scientist might ask How did the major political parties, government institutions and the private sector respond?; An economist might ask What were the economic causes of the Depression?; A geographer might ask How did the Depression affect areas of the United States differently?; A historian might ask What related economic, political and social events preceded the Depression? This Standard corresponds to Writing Standard 7 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

3

Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

4

Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

5

Evaluate the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source. Students investigating a question using online sources often find all too much material, some of it conflicting. The ability to be discerning and skeptical consumers of information is a crucial college, career, and civic skill. Beginning in elementary school, students should learn how and why to assess, verify, and cite sources. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 8 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

6

Argue or explain conclusions, using valid reasoning and evidence. The strength of an argument or explanation lies in its logical development of ideas, acknowledgement of counterclaims, and use of reliable supporting evidence. Effective arguments and explanations often go beyond text alone to include well-chosen and relevant visual elements such as photographs, maps, and displays of quantitative data. Students’ ability to adapt a presentation to the task, purpose, and audience and their ability to respond to questions are important skills for civic participation. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

7

Determine next steps and take informed action, as appropriate. One of the main goals of teaching history and the social science is to provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that enable them to participate in civic life. Some examples of those opportunities include: Exploring questions or problems in the form of classroom discussions, essays, research papers, and other products of research; Engaging in discourse about public policy beyond the classroom through social media, letters to the editor, oral presentations in public settings, or community service learning projects. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Pre-K - K Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Pre-K - K Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Pre-K - K Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Kindergarten – Many Roles in Living, Learning, and Working Together

Civics: classroom citizenship – Supporting Question: What does it mean to be responsible?

Geography: connections among places – Supporting Question: How do maps, globes, and photographs show different things about a place?

History: shared traditions – Supporting Question: How do we commemorate our shared history as a nation and community?

Economics: work and commerce (shared with pre-kindergarten) – Supporting Question: What kinds of work do women, men, and children do?

1st

Arts Education

Dance: Movement Elements and Dance Skills: Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and dance skills.

Dance: Choreography: Students will create movement compositions based on choreographic principles, processes, and forms.

Dance: Dance as Expression: Students will demonstrate an understanding of dance as a way to express and communicate meaning.

Dance: Performance in Dance: Students will rehearse and stage dance works.

Dance: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own dances and the dances of others using appropriate dance vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Music: Singing: Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Reading and Notation: Students will read music written in standard notation.

Music: Playing Instruments: Students will play instruments, alone and with others, to perform a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvisation and Composition: Students will improvise, compose, and arrange music.

Music: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own music and the music of others using appropriate music vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Theatre: Acting: Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes.

Theatre: Reading and Writing Scripts: Students will read, analyze, and write dramatic material.

Theatre: Directing: Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works.

Theatre: Technical Theatre: Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production.

Theatre: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own theatrical work and the work of others using appropriate theatre vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Visual Arts: Methods, Materials, and Techniques: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Visual Arts: Elements and Principles of Design: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression: Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

Visual Arts: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

Visual Arts: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Connections: Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, where appropriate, interpret their meanings.

Connections: Roles of Artists in Communities: Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Connections: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of style, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Connections: Inventions, Technologies, and the Arts: Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their works.

Connections: Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will use knowledge of the arts and cultural resources in the study of the arts, English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Health and PE

Growth and Development: Students will learn the basic characteristics of physical growth and development, including body functions and systems throughout the life cycle, and will acquire skills to promote and maintain positive growth and development.

Physical Activity and Fitness: Students will, by repeated practice, acquire and refine a variety of manipulative, locomotor, and non-locomotor movement skills, and will utilize principles of training and conditioning, will learn biomechanics and exercise physiology, and will apply the concept of wellness to their lives.

Nutrition: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Reproduction/Sexuality: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make effective personal decisions that promote their emotional, sexual, and reproductive health.

Mental Health: Students will acquire knowledge about emotions and physical health, the management of emotions, personality and character development, and social awareness; and will learn skills to promote self-acceptance, make decisions, and cope with stress, including suicide prevention.

Family Life: Students will gain knowledge about the significance of the family on individuals and society, and will learn skills to support the family, balance work and family life, be an effective parent, and nurture the development of children.

Interpersonal Relationships: Students will learn that relationships with others are an integral part of the human life experience and the factors that contribute to healthy interpersonal relationships, and will acquire skills to enhance and make many of these relationships more fulfilling through commitment and communication.

Disease Prevention and Control: Students will learn the signs, causes, and treatment of chronic and communicable diseases, and will gain skills related to health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to administer first aid and carry out emergency procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, will avoid, recognize, and report verbal, physical, and emotional abuse situations, and will assess the factors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injury, including motor vehicle accidents, fire safety, and weapons safety.

Tobacco, Alcohol, & Substance Use/Abuse Prevention: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be competent in making health-enhancing decisions regarding the use of medications and avoidance of substances, and in communicating about substance use/abuse prevention for healthier homes, schools, and communities.

Violence Prevention: Students will learn how their actions affect others, will understand the power that positive character traits can have in violence prevention, will gain skills to report incidents of violence and hurtful behavior to adults in the school and community, will avoid engaging in violence, and will identify constructive alternatives to violence, including how to discourage others from engaging in violence.

Consumer Health and Resource Management: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain, manage, and evaluate resources to maintain physical and mental health and well being for themselves, their family, and the community.

Ecological Health: Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Community and Public Health: Students will learn the influence of social factors on health, the contribution of public health, and will gain skills to promote health and to collaborate with others to facilitate healthy, safe, and supportive communities.

World Languages

Communication: Interpersonal Communication: Students of modern languages will converse in a language other than English to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students of classical languages will engage in simple oral exchanges and will develop reading skills with discussions of texts conducted in English.

Communication: Interpretive Communication: Students will understand and interpret ideas and information written or spoken in a language other than English. In classical language study, discussion will be conducted in English.

Communication: Presentational Communication: Students of modern languages will write and speak in a language other than English to present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics. Presentations in classical language classes will usually take the form of speaking or writing in English.

Cultures: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the traditions, perspectives, practices, and products of the culture studied, including human commonalities as reflected in history, literature, and the visual and performing arts. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Linguistic Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparison of the language studied with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Cultural Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparison of the target culture with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Connections: Students of modern and classical languages will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge of other disciplines and to acquire new information and knowledge. In classical language study, discussion and presentations will be in English.

Communities: Students will use languages other than English within and beyond the school setting. Students of classical languages will recognize elements of classical languages and ancient cultures in the world around them, and they will share insights derived from their study of classical languages with others within and beyond the classroom setting.

Science

Grade 1: Earth and Space Sciences

Grade 1: Life Science

Grade 1: Physical Science

Grade 1: Technology/Engineering

Mathematics

Mathematical Practice

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Measurement and Data

Geometry

Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Grade 1 Reading Standards for Literature [RL]

Grade 1 Reading Standards for Informational Text [RI]

Grade 1 Reading Standards for Foundational Skills [RF]

Grade 1 Writing Standards [W]

Grade 1 Speaking and Listening Standards [SL]

Grade 1 Language Standards [L]

Technology Education

Kindergarten – Grade 2: Computing and Society (CAS)

Kindergarten – Grade 2: Digital Tools and Collaboration (DTC)

Kindergarten-Grade 2: Computing Systems (CS)

Kindergarten – Grade 2: Computational Thinking (CT)

Social Studies

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

2

Develop focused questions or problem statements and conduct inquiries. The ability to develop focused research questions in history/social science or define the dimensions of a particular policy problem is central to learning in these disciplines. Students learn that each field in the social sciences has its own ways of defining questions. For example, in studying the Great Depression, A political scientist might ask How did the major political parties, government institutions and the private sector respond?; An economist might ask What were the economic causes of the Depression?; A geographer might ask How did the Depression affect areas of the United States differently?; A historian might ask What related economic, political and social events preceded the Depression? This Standard corresponds to Writing Standard 7 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

3

Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

4

Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

5

Evaluate the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source. Students investigating a question using online sources often find all too much material, some of it conflicting. The ability to be discerning and skeptical consumers of information is a crucial college, career, and civic skill. Beginning in elementary school, students should learn how and why to assess, verify, and cite sources. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 8 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

6

Argue or explain conclusions, using valid reasoning and evidence. The strength of an argument or explanation lies in its logical development of ideas, acknowledgement of counterclaims, and use of reliable supporting evidence. Effective arguments and explanations often go beyond text alone to include well-chosen and relevant visual elements such as photographs, maps, and displays of quantitative data. Students’ ability to adapt a presentation to the task, purpose, and audience and their ability to respond to questions are important skills for civic participation. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

7

Determine next steps and take informed action, as appropriate. One of the main goals of teaching history and the social science is to provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that enable them to participate in civic life. Some examples of those opportunities include: Exploring questions or problems in the form of classroom discussions, essays, research papers, and other products of research; Engaging in discourse about public policy beyond the classroom through social media, letters to the editor, oral presentations in public settings, or community service learning projects. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Grades 1-2 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Grades 1-2 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grades 1-2 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grade 1 – Leadership, Cooperation, Unity and Diversity

Civics: communities, elections, and leadership – Supporting Question: What does it mean to belong to or lead a group?

Geography: places to explore – Supporting Question: How can maps help people locate places and learn about them?

History: unity and diversity in the United States – Supporting Question: What does the motto, “Out of Many, One” mean and why is it a good motto of the United States?

Economics: resources and choices (shared with grade 2) – Supporting Question: How do the resources of an area affect its industries and jobs?

2nd

Arts Education

Dance: Movement Elements and Dance Skills: Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and dance skills.

Dance: Choreography: Students will create movement compositions based on choreographic principles, processes, and forms.

Dance: Dance as Expression: Students will demonstrate an understanding of dance as a way to express and communicate meaning.

Dance: Performance in Dance: Students will rehearse and stage dance works.

Dance: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own dances and the dances of others using appropriate dance vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Music: Singing: Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Reading and Notation: Students will read music written in standard notation.

Music: Playing Instruments: Students will play instruments, alone and with others, to perform a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvisation and Composition: Students will improvise, compose, and arrange music.

Music: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own music and the music of others using appropriate music vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Theatre: Acting: Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes.

Theatre: Reading and Writing Scripts: Students will read, analyze, and write dramatic material.

Theatre: Directing: Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works.

Theatre: Technical Theatre: Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production.

Theatre: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own theatrical work and the work of others using appropriate theatre vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Visual Arts: Methods, Materials, and Techniques: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Visual Arts: Elements and Principles of Design: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression: Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

Visual Arts: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

Visual Arts: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Connections: Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, where appropriate, interpret their meanings.

Connections: Roles of Artists in Communities: Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Connections: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of style, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Connections: Inventions, Technologies, and the Arts: Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their works.

Connections: Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will use knowledge of the arts and cultural resources in the study of the arts, English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Health and PE

Growth and Development: Students will learn the basic characteristics of physical growth and development, including body functions and systems throughout the life cycle, and will acquire skills to promote and maintain positive growth and development.

Physical Activity and Fitness: Students will, by repeated practice, acquire and refine a variety of manipulative, locomotor, and non-locomotor movement skills, and will utilize principles of training and conditioning, will learn biomechanics and exercise physiology, and will apply the concept of wellness to their lives.

Nutrition: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Reproduction/Sexuality: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make effective personal decisions that promote their emotional, sexual, and reproductive health.

Mental Health: Students will acquire knowledge about emotions and physical health, the management of emotions, personality and character development, and social awareness; and will learn skills to promote self-acceptance, make decisions, and cope with stress, including suicide prevention.

Family Life: Students will gain knowledge about the significance of the family on individuals and society, and will learn skills to support the family, balance work and family life, be an effective parent, and nurture the development of children.

Interpersonal Relationships: Students will learn that relationships with others are an integral part of the human life experience and the factors that contribute to healthy interpersonal relationships, and will acquire skills to enhance and make many of these relationships more fulfilling through commitment and communication.

Disease Prevention and Control: Students will learn the signs, causes, and treatment of chronic and communicable diseases, and will gain skills related to health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to administer first aid and carry out emergency procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, will avoid, recognize, and report verbal, physical, and emotional abuse situations, and will assess the factors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injury, including motor vehicle accidents, fire safety, and weapons safety.

Tobacco, Alcohol, & Substance Use/Abuse Prevention: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be competent in making health-enhancing decisions regarding the use of medications and avoidance of substances, and in communicating about substance use/abuse prevention for healthier homes, schools, and communities.

Violence Prevention: Students will learn how their actions affect others, will understand the power that positive character traits can have in violence prevention, will gain skills to report incidents of violence and hurtful behavior to adults in the school and community, will avoid engaging in violence, and will identify constructive alternatives to violence, including how to discourage others from engaging in violence.

Consumer Health and Resource Management: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain, manage, and evaluate resources to maintain physical and mental health and well being for themselves, their family, and the community.

Ecological Health: Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Community and Public Health: Students will learn the influence of social factors on health, the contribution of public health, and will gain skills to promote health and to collaborate with others to facilitate healthy, safe, and supportive communities.

World Languages

Communication: Interpersonal Communication: Students of modern languages will converse in a language other than English to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students of classical languages will engage in simple oral exchanges and will develop reading skills with discussions of texts conducted in English.

Communication: Interpretive Communication: Students will understand and interpret ideas and information written or spoken in a language other than English. In classical language study, discussion will be conducted in English.

Communication: Presentational Communication: Students of modern languages will write and speak in a language other than English to present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics. Presentations in classical language classes will usually take the form of speaking or writing in English.

Cultures: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the traditions, perspectives, practices, and products of the culture studied, including human commonalities as reflected in history, literature, and the visual and performing arts. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Linguistic Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparison of the language studied with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Cultural Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparison of the target culture with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Connections: Students of modern and classical languages will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge of other disciplines and to acquire new information and knowledge. In classical language study, discussion and presentations will be in English.

Communities: Students will use languages other than English within and beyond the school setting. Students of classical languages will recognize elements of classical languages and ancient cultures in the world around them, and they will share insights derived from their study of classical languages with others within and beyond the classroom setting.

Science

Grade 2: Earth and Space Sciences

Grade 2: Life Science

Grade 2: Physical Science

Grade 2: Technology/Engineering

Mathematics

Mathematical Practice

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Measurement and Data

Geometry

Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Grade 2 Reading Standards for Literature [RL]

Grade 2 Reading Standards for Informational Text [RI]

Grade 2 Reading Standards for Foundational Skills [RF]

Grade 2 Writing Standards [W]

Grade 2 Speaking and Listening Standards [SL]

Grade 2 Language Standards [L]

Technology Education

Kindergarten – Grade 2: Computing and Society (CAS)

Kindergarten – Grade 2: Digital Tools and Collaboration (DTC)

Kindergarten-Grade 2: Computing Systems (CS)

Kindergarten – Grade 2: Computational Thinking (CT)

Social Studies

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

2

Develop focused questions or problem statements and conduct inquiries. The ability to develop focused research questions in history/social science or define the dimensions of a particular policy problem is central to learning in these disciplines. Students learn that each field in the social sciences has its own ways of defining questions. For example, in studying the Great Depression, A political scientist might ask How did the major political parties, government institutions and the private sector respond?; An economist might ask What were the economic causes of the Depression?; A geographer might ask How did the Depression affect areas of the United States differently?; A historian might ask What related economic, political and social events preceded the Depression? This Standard corresponds to Writing Standard 7 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

3

Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

4

Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

5

Evaluate the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source. Students investigating a question using online sources often find all too much material, some of it conflicting. The ability to be discerning and skeptical consumers of information is a crucial college, career, and civic skill. Beginning in elementary school, students should learn how and why to assess, verify, and cite sources. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 8 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

6

Argue or explain conclusions, using valid reasoning and evidence. The strength of an argument or explanation lies in its logical development of ideas, acknowledgement of counterclaims, and use of reliable supporting evidence. Effective arguments and explanations often go beyond text alone to include well-chosen and relevant visual elements such as photographs, maps, and displays of quantitative data. Students’ ability to adapt a presentation to the task, purpose, and audience and their ability to respond to questions are important skills for civic participation. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

7

Determine next steps and take informed action, as appropriate. One of the main goals of teaching history and the social science is to provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that enable them to participate in civic life. Some examples of those opportunities include: Exploring questions or problems in the form of classroom discussions, essays, research papers, and other products of research; Engaging in discourse about public policy beyond the classroom through social media, letters to the editor, oral presentations in public settings, or community service learning projects. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Grades 1-2 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Grades 1-2 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grades 1-2 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grade 2 – Global Geography: Places and Peoples, Cultures and Resources

Reading and making maps – Supporting Question: What do maps show?

Geography and its effects on people – Supporting Question: How do people adapt to or change their environment?

History: migrations and cultures – Supporting Question: What are the different reasons people choose to settle in a community?

Civics in the context of geography: countries and governments – Supporting Question: Why are continents divided into countries?

Economics: resources and choices (shared with grade 1) – Supporting Question: How do the resources of an area affect its industries and jobs?

3rd

Arts Education

Dance: Movement Elements and Dance Skills: Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and dance skills.

Dance: Choreography: Students will create movement compositions based on choreographic principles, processes, and forms.

Dance: Dance as Expression: Students will demonstrate an understanding of dance as a way to express and communicate meaning.

Dance: Performance in Dance: Students will rehearse and stage dance works.

Dance: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own dances and the dances of others using appropriate dance vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Music: Singing: Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Reading and Notation: Students will read music written in standard notation.

Music: Playing Instruments: Students will play instruments, alone and with others, to perform a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvisation and Composition: Students will improvise, compose, and arrange music.

Music: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own music and the music of others using appropriate music vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Theatre: Acting: Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes.

Theatre: Reading and Writing Scripts: Students will read, analyze, and write dramatic material.

Theatre: Directing: Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works.

Theatre: Technical Theatre: Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production.

Theatre: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own theatrical work and the work of others using appropriate theatre vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Visual Arts: Methods, Materials, and Techniques: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Visual Arts: Elements and Principles of Design: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression: Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

Visual Arts: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

Visual Arts: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Connections: Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, where appropriate, interpret their meanings.

Connections: Roles of Artists in Communities: Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Connections: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of style, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Connections: Inventions, Technologies, and the Arts: Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their works.

Connections: Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will use knowledge of the arts and cultural resources in the study of the arts, English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Health and PE

Growth and Development: Students will learn the basic characteristics of physical growth and development, including body functions and systems throughout the life cycle, and will acquire skills to promote and maintain positive growth and development.

Physical Activity and Fitness: Students will, by repeated practice, acquire and refine a variety of manipulative, locomotor, and non-locomotor movement skills, and will utilize principles of training and conditioning, will learn biomechanics and exercise physiology, and will apply the concept of wellness to their lives.

Nutrition: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Reproduction/Sexuality: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make effective personal decisions that promote their emotional, sexual, and reproductive health.

Mental Health: Students will acquire knowledge about emotions and physical health, the management of emotions, personality and character development, and social awareness; and will learn skills to promote self-acceptance, make decisions, and cope with stress, including suicide prevention.

Family Life: Students will gain knowledge about the significance of the family on individuals and society, and will learn skills to support the family, balance work and family life, be an effective parent, and nurture the development of children.

Interpersonal Relationships: Students will learn that relationships with others are an integral part of the human life experience and the factors that contribute to healthy interpersonal relationships, and will acquire skills to enhance and make many of these relationships more fulfilling through commitment and communication.

Disease Prevention and Control: Students will learn the signs, causes, and treatment of chronic and communicable diseases, and will gain skills related to health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to administer first aid and carry out emergency procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, will avoid, recognize, and report verbal, physical, and emotional abuse situations, and will assess the factors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injury, including motor vehicle accidents, fire safety, and weapons safety.

Tobacco, Alcohol, & Substance Use/Abuse Prevention: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be competent in making health-enhancing decisions regarding the use of medications and avoidance of substances, and in communicating about substance use/abuse prevention for healthier homes, schools, and communities.

Violence Prevention: Students will learn how their actions affect others, will understand the power that positive character traits can have in violence prevention, will gain skills to report incidents of violence and hurtful behavior to adults in the school and community, will avoid engaging in violence, and will identify constructive alternatives to violence, including how to discourage others from engaging in violence.

Consumer Health and Resource Management: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain, manage, and evaluate resources to maintain physical and mental health and well being for themselves, their family, and the community.

Ecological Health: Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Community and Public Health: Students will learn the influence of social factors on health, the contribution of public health, and will gain skills to promote health and to collaborate with others to facilitate healthy, safe, and supportive communities.

World Languages

Communication: Interpersonal Communication: Students of modern languages will converse in a language other than English to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students of classical languages will engage in simple oral exchanges and will develop reading skills with discussions of texts conducted in English.

Communication: Interpretive Communication: Students will understand and interpret ideas and information written or spoken in a language other than English. In classical language study, discussion will be conducted in English.

Communication: Presentational Communication: Students of modern languages will write and speak in a language other than English to present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics. Presentations in classical language classes will usually take the form of speaking or writing in English.

Cultures: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the traditions, perspectives, practices, and products of the culture studied, including human commonalities as reflected in history, literature, and the visual and performing arts. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Linguistic Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparison of the language studied with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Cultural Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparison of the target culture with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Connections: Students of modern and classical languages will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge of other disciplines and to acquire new information and knowledge. In classical language study, discussion and presentations will be in English.

Communities: Students will use languages other than English within and beyond the school setting. Students of classical languages will recognize elements of classical languages and ancient cultures in the world around them, and they will share insights derived from their study of classical languages with others within and beyond the classroom setting.

Science

Grade 3: Earth and Space Sciences

Grade 3: Life Science

Grade 3: Physical Science

Grade 3: Technology/Engineering

Mathematics

Mathematical Practice

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Number and Operations—Fractions

Measurement and Data

Geometry

Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Grade 3 Reading Standards for Literature [RL]

Grade 3 Reading Standards for Informational Text [RI]

Grade 3 Reading Standards for Foundational Skills [RF]

Grade 3 Writing Standards [W]

Grade 3 Speaking and Listening Standards [SL]

Grade 3 Language Standards [L]

Technology Education

Grades 3 – 5: Computing and Society (CAS)

Grades 3-5: Digital Tools and Collaboration (DTC)

Grades 3 – 5: Computing Systems (CS)

Grades 3 – 5: Computational Thinking (CT)

Social Studies

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

2

Develop focused questions or problem statements and conduct inquiries. The ability to develop focused research questions in history/social science or define the dimensions of a particular policy problem is central to learning in these disciplines. Students learn that each field in the social sciences has its own ways of defining questions. For example, in studying the Great Depression, A political scientist might ask How did the major political parties, government institutions and the private sector respond?; An economist might ask What were the economic causes of the Depression?; A geographer might ask How did the Depression affect areas of the United States differently?; A historian might ask What related economic, political and social events preceded the Depression? This Standard corresponds to Writing Standard 7 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

3

Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

4

Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

5

Evaluate the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source. Students investigating a question using online sources often find all too much material, some of it conflicting. The ability to be discerning and skeptical consumers of information is a crucial college, career, and civic skill. Beginning in elementary school, students should learn how and why to assess, verify, and cite sources. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 8 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

6

Argue or explain conclusions, using valid reasoning and evidence. The strength of an argument or explanation lies in its logical development of ideas, acknowledgement of counterclaims, and use of reliable supporting evidence. Effective arguments and explanations often go beyond text alone to include well-chosen and relevant visual elements such as photographs, maps, and displays of quantitative data. Students’ ability to adapt a presentation to the task, purpose, and audience and their ability to respond to questions are important skills for civic participation. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

7

Determine next steps and take informed action, as appropriate. One of the main goals of teaching history and the social science is to provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that enable them to participate in civic life. Some examples of those opportunities include: Exploring questions or problems in the form of classroom discussions, essays, research papers, and other products of research; Engaging in discourse about public policy beyond the classroom through social media, letters to the editor, oral presentations in public settings, or community service learning projects. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Grades 3-5 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Grades 3-5 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grades 3-5 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grade 3 – Massachusetts, Home to Many Different People

Massachusetts cities and towns today and in history – Supporting Question: How can people get involved in government?

The geography and Native Peoples of Massachusetts – Supporting Question: How did Native Peoples live in New England before Europeans arrived?

European explorers’ first contacts with Native Peoples in the Northeast – Supporting Question: How did European explorers describe the Northeast and its Native Peoples?

The Pilgrims, the Plymouth Colony, and Native Communities – Supporting Question: What were the challenges for women and men in the early years in Plymouth?

The Puritans, the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Native Peoples, and Africans – Supporting Question: How did the interactions of Native Peoples, Europeans, and enslaved and free Africans shape the development of Massachusetts?

Massachusetts in the 18th century through the American Revolution – Supporting Questions: Why is Massachusetts important to the nation’s history? How did different views about the fairness of taxes and government lead to the American Revolution?

4th

Arts Education

Dance: Movement Elements and Dance Skills: Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and dance skills.

Dance: Choreography: Students will create movement compositions based on choreographic principles, processes, and forms.

Dance: Dance as Expression: Students will demonstrate an understanding of dance as a way to express and communicate meaning.

Dance: Performance in Dance: Students will rehearse and stage dance works.

Dance: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own dances and the dances of others using appropriate dance vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Music: Singing: Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Reading and Notation: Students will read music written in standard notation.

Music: Playing Instruments: Students will play instruments, alone and with others, to perform a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvisation and Composition: Students will improvise, compose, and arrange music.

Music: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own music and the music of others using appropriate music vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Theatre: Acting: Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes.

Theatre: Reading and Writing Scripts: Students will read, analyze, and write dramatic material.

Theatre: Directing: Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works.

Theatre: Technical Theatre: Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production.

Theatre: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own theatrical work and the work of others using appropriate theatre vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Visual Arts: Methods, Materials, and Techniques: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Visual Arts: Elements and Principles of Design: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression: Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

Visual Arts: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

Visual Arts: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Connections: Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, where appropriate, interpret their meanings.

Connections: Roles of Artists in Communities: Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Connections: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of style, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Connections: Inventions, Technologies, and the Arts: Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their works.

Connections: Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will use knowledge of the arts and cultural resources in the study of the arts, English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Health and PE

Growth and Development: Students will learn the basic characteristics of physical growth and development, including body functions and systems throughout the life cycle, and will acquire skills to promote and maintain positive growth and development.

Physical Activity and Fitness: Students will, by repeated practice, acquire and refine a variety of manipulative, locomotor, and non-locomotor movement skills, and will utilize principles of training and conditioning, will learn biomechanics and exercise physiology, and will apply the concept of wellness to their lives.

Nutrition: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Reproduction/Sexuality: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make effective personal decisions that promote their emotional, sexual, and reproductive health.

Mental Health: Students will acquire knowledge about emotions and physical health, the management of emotions, personality and character development, and social awareness; and will learn skills to promote self-acceptance, make decisions, and cope with stress, including suicide prevention.

Family Life: Students will gain knowledge about the significance of the family on individuals and society, and will learn skills to support the family, balance work and family life, be an effective parent, and nurture the development of children.

Interpersonal Relationships: Students will learn that relationships with others are an integral part of the human life experience and the factors that contribute to healthy interpersonal relationships, and will acquire skills to enhance and make many of these relationships more fulfilling through commitment and communication.

Disease Prevention and Control: Students will learn the signs, causes, and treatment of chronic and communicable diseases, and will gain skills related to health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to administer first aid and carry out emergency procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, will avoid, recognize, and report verbal, physical, and emotional abuse situations, and will assess the factors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injury, including motor vehicle accidents, fire safety, and weapons safety.

Tobacco, Alcohol, & Substance Use/Abuse Prevention: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be competent in making health-enhancing decisions regarding the use of medications and avoidance of substances, and in communicating about substance use/abuse prevention for healthier homes, schools, and communities.

Violence Prevention: Students will learn how their actions affect others, will understand the power that positive character traits can have in violence prevention, will gain skills to report incidents of violence and hurtful behavior to adults in the school and community, will avoid engaging in violence, and will identify constructive alternatives to violence, including how to discourage others from engaging in violence.

Consumer Health and Resource Management: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain, manage, and evaluate resources to maintain physical and mental health and well being for themselves, their family, and the community.

Ecological Health: Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Community and Public Health: Students will learn the influence of social factors on health, the contribution of public health, and will gain skills to promote health and to collaborate with others to facilitate healthy, safe, and supportive communities.

World Languages

Communication: Interpersonal Communication: Students of modern languages will converse in a language other than English to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students of classical languages will engage in simple oral exchanges and will develop reading skills with discussions of texts conducted in English.

Communication: Interpretive Communication: Students will understand and interpret ideas and information written or spoken in a language other than English. In classical language study, discussion will be conducted in English.

Communication: Presentational Communication: Students of modern languages will write and speak in a language other than English to present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics. Presentations in classical language classes will usually take the form of speaking or writing in English.

Cultures: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the traditions, perspectives, practices, and products of the culture studied, including human commonalities as reflected in history, literature, and the visual and performing arts. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Linguistic Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparison of the language studied with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Cultural Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparison of the target culture with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Connections: Students of modern and classical languages will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge of other disciplines and to acquire new information and knowledge. In classical language study, discussion and presentations will be in English.

Communities: Students will use languages other than English within and beyond the school setting. Students of classical languages will recognize elements of classical languages and ancient cultures in the world around them, and they will share insights derived from their study of classical languages with others within and beyond the classroom setting.

Science

Grade 4: Earth and Space Sciences

Grade 4: Life Science

Physical Science

Grade 4: Technology/Engineering

Mathematics

Mathematical Practice

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Number and Operations—Fractions

Measurement and Data

Geometry

Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Grade 4 Reading Standards for Literature [RL]

Grade 4 Reading Standards for Informational Text [RI]

Grade 4 Reading Standards for Foundational Skills [RF]

Grade 4 Writing Standards [W]

Grade 4 Speaking and Listening Standards [SL]

Grade 4 Language Standards [L]

Technology Education

Grades 3 – 5: Computing and Society (CAS)

Grades 3-5: Digital Tools and Collaboration (DTC)

Grades 3 – 5: Computing Systems (CS)

Grades 3 – 5: Computational Thinking (CT)

Social Studies

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

2

Develop focused questions or problem statements and conduct inquiries. The ability to develop focused research questions in history/social science or define the dimensions of a particular policy problem is central to learning in these disciplines. Students learn that each field in the social sciences has its own ways of defining questions. For example, in studying the Great Depression, A political scientist might ask How did the major political parties, government institutions and the private sector respond?; An economist might ask What were the economic causes of the Depression?; A geographer might ask How did the Depression affect areas of the United States differently?; A historian might ask What related economic, political and social events preceded the Depression? This Standard corresponds to Writing Standard 7 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

3

Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

4

Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

5

Evaluate the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source. Students investigating a question using online sources often find all too much material, some of it conflicting. The ability to be discerning and skeptical consumers of information is a crucial college, career, and civic skill. Beginning in elementary school, students should learn how and why to assess, verify, and cite sources. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 8 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

6

Argue or explain conclusions, using valid reasoning and evidence. The strength of an argument or explanation lies in its logical development of ideas, acknowledgement of counterclaims, and use of reliable supporting evidence. Effective arguments and explanations often go beyond text alone to include well-chosen and relevant visual elements such as photographs, maps, and displays of quantitative data. Students’ ability to adapt a presentation to the task, purpose, and audience and their ability to respond to questions are important skills for civic participation. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

7

Determine next steps and take informed action, as appropriate. One of the main goals of teaching history and the social science is to provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that enable them to participate in civic life. Some examples of those opportunities include: Exploring questions or problems in the form of classroom discussions, essays, research papers, and other products of research; Engaging in discourse about public policy beyond the classroom through social media, letters to the editor, oral presentations in public settings, or community service learning projects. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Grades 3-5 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Grades 3-5 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grades 3-5 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grade 4 – North American Geography, History, and Peoples

North America: geography and map skills – Supporting Question: What are the physical features and nations of North America?

Ancient civilizations of North America – Supporting Question: How do archaeologists develop theories about ancient migrations?

Early European exploration and conquest – Supporting Question: What were the reasons for European voyages across the Atlantic Ocean?

The expansion of the United States over time and its regions today – Supporting Question: How has the environment shaped the development of each region?

The Northeast

The Southeast

The Midwest

The Southwest

The West

5th

Arts Education

Dance: Movement Elements and Dance Skills: Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and dance skills.

Dance: Choreography: Students will create movement compositions based on choreographic principles, processes, and forms.

Dance: Dance as Expression: Students will demonstrate an understanding of dance as a way to express and communicate meaning.

Dance: Performance in Dance: Students will rehearse and stage dance works.

Dance: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own dances and the dances of others using appropriate dance vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Music: Singing: Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Reading and Notation: Students will read music written in standard notation.

Music: Playing Instruments: Students will play instruments, alone and with others, to perform a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvisation and Composition: Students will improvise, compose, and arrange music.

Music: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own music and the music of others using appropriate music vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Theatre: Acting: Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes.

Theatre: Reading and Writing Scripts: Students will read, analyze, and write dramatic material.

Theatre: Directing: Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works.

Theatre: Technical Theatre: Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production.

Theatre: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own theatrical work and the work of others using appropriate theatre vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Visual Arts: Methods, Materials, and Techniques: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Visual Arts: Elements and Principles of Design: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression: Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

Visual Arts: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

Visual Arts: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Connections: Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, where appropriate, interpret their meanings.

Connections: Roles of Artists in Communities: Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Connections: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of style, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Connections: Inventions, Technologies, and the Arts: Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their works.

Connections: Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will use knowledge of the arts and cultural resources in the study of the arts, English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Health and PE

Growth and Development: Students will learn the basic characteristics of physical growth and development, including body functions and systems throughout the life cycle, and will acquire skills to promote and maintain positive growth and development.

Physical Activity and Fitness: Students will, by repeated practice, acquire and refine a variety of manipulative, locomotor, and non-locomotor movement skills, and will utilize principles of training and conditioning, will learn biomechanics and exercise physiology, and will apply the concept of wellness to their lives.

Nutrition: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Reproduction/Sexuality: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make effective personal decisions that promote their emotional, sexual, and reproductive health.

Mental Health: Students will acquire knowledge about emotions and physical health, the management of emotions, personality and character development, and social awareness; and will learn skills to promote self-acceptance, make decisions, and cope with stress, including suicide prevention.

Family Life: Students will gain knowledge about the significance of the family on individuals and society, and will learn skills to support the family, balance work and family life, be an effective parent, and nurture the development of children.

Interpersonal Relationships: Students will learn that relationships with others are an integral part of the human life experience and the factors that contribute to healthy interpersonal relationships, and will acquire skills to enhance and make many of these relationships more fulfilling through commitment and communication.

Disease Prevention and Control: Students will learn the signs, causes, and treatment of chronic and communicable diseases, and will gain skills related to health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to administer first aid and carry out emergency procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, will avoid, recognize, and report verbal, physical, and emotional abuse situations, and will assess the factors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injury, including motor vehicle accidents, fire safety, and weapons safety.

Tobacco, Alcohol, & Substance Use/Abuse Prevention: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be competent in making health-enhancing decisions regarding the use of medications and avoidance of substances, and in communicating about substance use/abuse prevention for healthier homes, schools, and communities.

Violence Prevention: Students will learn how their actions affect others, will understand the power that positive character traits can have in violence prevention, will gain skills to report incidents of violence and hurtful behavior to adults in the school and community, will avoid engaging in violence, and will identify constructive alternatives to violence, including how to discourage others from engaging in violence.

Consumer Health and Resource Management: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain, manage, and evaluate resources to maintain physical and mental health and well being for themselves, their family, and the community.

Ecological Health: Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Community and Public Health: Students will learn the influence of social factors on health, the contribution of public health, and will gain skills to promote health and to collaborate with others to facilitate healthy, safe, and supportive communities.

World Languages

Communication: Interpersonal Communication: Students of modern languages will converse in a language other than English to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students of classical languages will engage in simple oral exchanges and will develop reading skills with discussions of texts conducted in English.

Communication: Interpretive Communication: Students will understand and interpret ideas and information written or spoken in a language other than English. In classical language study, discussion will be conducted in English.

Communication: Presentational Communication: Students of modern languages will write and speak in a language other than English to present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics. Presentations in classical language classes will usually take the form of speaking or writing in English.

Cultures: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the traditions, perspectives, practices, and products of the culture studied, including human commonalities as reflected in history, literature, and the visual and performing arts. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Linguistic Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparison of the language studied with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Cultural Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparison of the target culture with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Connections: Students of modern and classical languages will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge of other disciplines and to acquire new information and knowledge. In classical language study, discussion and presentations will be in English.

Communities: Students will use languages other than English within and beyond the school setting. Students of classical languages will recognize elements of classical languages and ancient cultures in the world around them, and they will share insights derived from their study of classical languages with others within and beyond the classroom setting.

Science

Grade 5: Earth and Space Sciences

Grade 5: Life Science

Grade 5: Physical Science

Grade 5: Technology/Engineering

Mathematics

Mathematical Practice

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Number and Operations—Fractions

Measurement and Data

Geometry

Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Grade 5 Reading Standards for Literature [RL]

Grade 5 Reading Standards for Informational Text [RI]

Grade 5 Reading Standards for Foundational Skills [RF]

Grade 5 Writing Standards [W]

Grade 5 Speaking and Listening Standards [SL]

Grade 5 Language Standards [L]

Technology Education

Grades 3 – 5: Computing and Society (CAS)

Grades 3-5: Digital Tools and Collaboration (DTC)

Grades 3 – 5: Computing Systems (CS)

Grades 3 – 5: Computational Thinking (CT)

Social Studies

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

2

Develop focused questions or problem statements and conduct inquiries. The ability to develop focused research questions in history/social science or define the dimensions of a particular policy problem is central to learning in these disciplines. Students learn that each field in the social sciences has its own ways of defining questions. For example, in studying the Great Depression, A political scientist might ask How did the major political parties, government institutions and the private sector respond?; An economist might ask What were the economic causes of the Depression?; A geographer might ask How did the Depression affect areas of the United States differently?; A historian might ask What related economic, political and social events preceded the Depression? This Standard corresponds to Writing Standard 7 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

3

Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

4

Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

5

Evaluate the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source. Students investigating a question using online sources often find all too much material, some of it conflicting. The ability to be discerning and skeptical consumers of information is a crucial college, career, and civic skill. Beginning in elementary school, students should learn how and why to assess, verify, and cite sources. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 8 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

6

Argue or explain conclusions, using valid reasoning and evidence. The strength of an argument or explanation lies in its logical development of ideas, acknowledgement of counterclaims, and use of reliable supporting evidence. Effective arguments and explanations often go beyond text alone to include well-chosen and relevant visual elements such as photographs, maps, and displays of quantitative data. Students’ ability to adapt a presentation to the task, purpose, and audience and their ability to respond to questions are important skills for civic participation. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

7

Determine next steps and take informed action, as appropriate. One of the main goals of teaching history and the social science is to provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that enable them to participate in civic life. Some examples of those opportunities include: Exploring questions or problems in the form of classroom discussions, essays, research papers, and other products of research; Engaging in discourse about public policy beyond the classroom through social media, letters to the editor, oral presentations in public settings, or community service learning projects. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Grades 3-5 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Grades 3-5 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grades 3-5 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grade 5 – United States History to the Civil War and the Modern Civil Rights Movement

Early colonization and growth of colonies – Supporting Question: To what extent was North America a land of opportunity, and for whom?

Reasons for revolution, the Revolutionary War, and the formation of government – Supporting Questions: Why did most Native Peoples side with the French against the British in the French and Indian Wars? Were the colonists justified in rebelling against Great Britain in the American Revolution?

Principles of United States Government – Supporting Question: How did the Constitution attempt to balance competing interests, the question of power, and ideas about slavery?

The growth of the Republic – Supporting Question: How did events of the early Republic test the newly-founded United States?

Slavery, the legacy of the Civil War, and the struggle for civil rights for all – Supporting Question: What ideas and events of the 19th century led to the expansion of civil rights in the 20th and 21st centuries?

6th

Arts Education

Dance: Movement Elements and Dance Skills: Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and dance skills.

Dance: Choreography: Students will create movement compositions based on choreographic principles, processes, and forms.

Dance: Dance as Expression: Students will demonstrate an understanding of dance as a way to express and communicate meaning.

Dance: Performance in Dance: Students will rehearse and stage dance works.

Dance: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own dances and the dances of others using appropriate dance vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Music: Singing: Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Reading and Notation: Students will read music written in standard notation.

Music: Playing Instruments: Students will play instruments, alone and with others, to perform a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvisation and Composition: Students will improvise, compose, and arrange music.

Music: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own music and the music of others using appropriate music vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Theatre: Acting: Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes.

Theatre: Reading and Writing Scripts: Students will read, analyze, and write dramatic material.

Theatre: Directing: Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works.

Theatre: Technical Theatre: Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production.

Theatre: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own theatrical work and the work of others using appropriate theatre vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Visual Arts: Methods, Materials, and Techniques: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Visual Arts: Elements and Principles of Design: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression: Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

Visual Arts: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

Visual Arts: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Connections: Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, where appropriate, interpret their meanings.

Connections: Roles of Artists in Communities: Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Connections: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of style, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Connections: Inventions, Technologies, and the Arts: Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their works.

Connections: Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will use knowledge of the arts and cultural resources in the study of the arts, English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Health and PE

Growth and Development: Students will learn the basic characteristics of physical growth and development, including body functions and systems throughout the life cycle, and will acquire skills to promote and maintain positive growth and development.

Physical Activity and Fitness: Students will, by repeated practice, acquire and refine a variety of manipulative, locomotor, and non-locomotor movement skills, and will utilize principles of training and conditioning, will learn biomechanics and exercise physiology, and will apply the concept of wellness to their lives.

Nutrition: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Reproduction/Sexuality: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make effective personal decisions that promote their emotional, sexual, and reproductive health.

Mental Health: Students will acquire knowledge about emotions and physical health, the management of emotions, personality and character development, and social awareness; and will learn skills to promote self-acceptance, make decisions, and cope with stress, including suicide prevention.

Family Life: Students will gain knowledge about the significance of the family on individuals and society, and will learn skills to support the family, balance work and family life, be an effective parent, and nurture the development of children.

Interpersonal Relationships: Students will learn that relationships with others are an integral part of the human life experience and the factors that contribute to healthy interpersonal relationships, and will acquire skills to enhance and make many of these relationships more fulfilling through commitment and communication.

Disease Prevention and Control: Students will learn the signs, causes, and treatment of chronic and communicable diseases, and will gain skills related to health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to administer first aid and carry out emergency procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, will avoid, recognize, and report verbal, physical, and emotional abuse situations, and will assess the factors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injury, including motor vehicle accidents, fire safety, and weapons safety.

Tobacco, Alcohol, & Substance Use/Abuse Prevention: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be competent in making health-enhancing decisions regarding the use of medications and avoidance of substances, and in communicating about substance use/abuse prevention for healthier homes, schools, and communities.

Violence Prevention: Students will learn how their actions affect others, will understand the power that positive character traits can have in violence prevention, will gain skills to report incidents of violence and hurtful behavior to adults in the school and community, will avoid engaging in violence, and will identify constructive alternatives to violence, including how to discourage others from engaging in violence.

Consumer Health and Resource Management: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain, manage, and evaluate resources to maintain physical and mental health and well being for themselves, their family, and the community.

Ecological Health: Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Community and Public Health: Students will learn the influence of social factors on health, the contribution of public health, and will gain skills to promote health and to collaborate with others to facilitate healthy, safe, and supportive communities.

World Languages

Communication: Interpersonal Communication: Students of modern languages will converse in a language other than English to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students of classical languages will engage in simple oral exchanges and will develop reading skills with discussions of texts conducted in English.

Communication: Interpretive Communication: Students will understand and interpret ideas and information written or spoken in a language other than English. In classical language study, discussion will be conducted in English.

Communication: Presentational Communication: Students of modern languages will write and speak in a language other than English to present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics. Presentations in classical language classes will usually take the form of speaking or writing in English.

Cultures: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the traditions, perspectives, practices, and products of the culture studied, including human commonalities as reflected in history, literature, and the visual and performing arts. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Linguistic Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparison of the language studied with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Cultural Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparison of the target culture with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Connections: Students of modern and classical languages will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge of other disciplines and to acquire new information and knowledge. In classical language study, discussion and presentations will be in English.

Communities: Students will use languages other than English within and beyond the school setting. Students of classical languages will recognize elements of classical languages and ancient cultures in the world around them, and they will share insights derived from their study of classical languages with others within and beyond the classroom setting.

Science

Grade 6: Earth and Space Sciences

Grade 6: Life Science

Grade 6: Physical Science

Grade 6: Technology/Engineering

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Mathematics

Mathematical Practice

Ratios and Proportional Relationships

The Number System

Expressions and Equations

Geometry

Statistics and Probability

Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Grades 6–8 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Studies [RCA-H]

Grades 6–8 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: Science and Career and Technical Subjects [RCA-ST]

Grades 6–8 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [WCA]

Grades 6–8 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [SLCA]

Grade 6 Reading Standards for Literature [RL]

Grade 6 Reading Standards for Informational Text [RI]

Grade 6 Writing Standards [W]

Grade 6 Speaking and Listening Standards [SL]

Grade 6 Language Standards [L]

Technology Education

Grades 6 – 8: Computing and Society (CAS)

Grades 6 – 8: Digital Tools and Collaboration (DTC)

Grades 6 – 8: Computing Systems (CS)

Grades 6 – 8: Computational Thinking (CT)

Social Studies

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

2

Develop focused questions or problem statements and conduct inquiries. The ability to develop focused research questions in history/social science or define the dimensions of a particular policy problem is central to learning in these disciplines. Students learn that each field in the social sciences has its own ways of defining questions. For example, in studying the Great Depression, A political scientist might ask How did the major political parties, government institutions and the private sector respond?; An economist might ask What were the economic causes of the Depression?; A geographer might ask How did the Depression affect areas of the United States differently?; A historian might ask What related economic, political and social events preceded the Depression? This Standard corresponds to Writing Standard 7 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

3

Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

4

Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

5

Evaluate the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source. Students investigating a question using online sources often find all too much material, some of it conflicting. The ability to be discerning and skeptical consumers of information is a crucial college, career, and civic skill. Beginning in elementary school, students should learn how and why to assess, verify, and cite sources. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 8 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

6

Argue or explain conclusions, using valid reasoning and evidence. The strength of an argument or explanation lies in its logical development of ideas, acknowledgement of counterclaims, and use of reliable supporting evidence. Effective arguments and explanations often go beyond text alone to include well-chosen and relevant visual elements such as photographs, maps, and displays of quantitative data. Students’ ability to adapt a presentation to the task, purpose, and audience and their ability to respond to questions are important skills for civic participation. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

7

Determine next steps and take informed action, as appropriate. One of the main goals of teaching history and the social science is to provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that enable them to participate in civic life. Some examples of those opportunities include: Exploring questions or problems in the form of classroom discussions, essays, research papers, and other products of research; Engaging in discourse about public policy beyond the classroom through social media, letters to the editor, oral presentations in public settings, or community service learning projects. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Grades 6-8 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Grades 6-8 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grades 6-8 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grade 6 – World Geography and Ancient Civilizations I

Studying complex societies, past and present – Supporting Question: What do the social sciences contribute to our understanding of the world?

Human origins, the Neolithic and Paleolithic Eras – Supporting Question: How did life on Earth begin and why did humans form complex societies?

Western Asia, the Middle East and North Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa

Central America, the Caribbean Islands, and South America

7th

Arts Education

Dance: Movement Elements and Dance Skills: Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and dance skills.

Dance: Choreography: Students will create movement compositions based on choreographic principles, processes, and forms.

Dance: Dance as Expression: Students will demonstrate an understanding of dance as a way to express and communicate meaning.

Dance: Performance in Dance: Students will rehearse and stage dance works.

Dance: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own dances and the dances of others using appropriate dance vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Music: Singing: Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Reading and Notation: Students will read music written in standard notation.

Music: Playing Instruments: Students will play instruments, alone and with others, to perform a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvisation and Composition: Students will improvise, compose, and arrange music.

Music: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own music and the music of others using appropriate music vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Theatre: Acting: Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes.

Theatre: Reading and Writing Scripts: Students will read, analyze, and write dramatic material.

Theatre: Directing: Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works.

Theatre: Technical Theatre: Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production.

Theatre: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own theatrical work and the work of others using appropriate theatre vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Visual Arts: Methods, Materials, and Techniques: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Visual Arts: Elements and Principles of Design: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression: Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

Visual Arts: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

Visual Arts: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Connections: Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, where appropriate, interpret their meanings.

Connections: Roles of Artists in Communities: Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Connections: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of style, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Connections: Inventions, Technologies, and the Arts: Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their works.

Connections: Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will use knowledge of the arts and cultural resources in the study of the arts, English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Health and PE

Growth and Development: Students will learn the basic characteristics of physical growth and development, including body functions and systems throughout the life cycle, and will acquire skills to promote and maintain positive growth and development.

Physical Activity and Fitness: Students will, by repeated practice, acquire and refine a variety of manipulative, locomotor, and non-locomotor movement skills, and will utilize principles of training and conditioning, will learn biomechanics and exercise physiology, and will apply the concept of wellness to their lives.

Nutrition: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Reproduction/Sexuality: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make effective personal decisions that promote their emotional, sexual, and reproductive health.

Mental Health: Students will acquire knowledge about emotions and physical health, the management of emotions, personality and character development, and social awareness; and will learn skills to promote self-acceptance, make decisions, and cope with stress, including suicide prevention.

Family Life: Students will gain knowledge about the significance of the family on individuals and society, and will learn skills to support the family, balance work and family life, be an effective parent, and nurture the development of children.

Interpersonal Relationships: Students will learn that relationships with others are an integral part of the human life experience and the factors that contribute to healthy interpersonal relationships, and will acquire skills to enhance and make many of these relationships more fulfilling through commitment and communication.

Disease Prevention and Control: Students will learn the signs, causes, and treatment of chronic and communicable diseases, and will gain skills related to health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to administer first aid and carry out emergency procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, will avoid, recognize, and report verbal, physical, and emotional abuse situations, and will assess the factors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injury, including motor vehicle accidents, fire safety, and weapons safety.

Tobacco, Alcohol, & Substance Use/Abuse Prevention: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be competent in making health-enhancing decisions regarding the use of medications and avoidance of substances, and in communicating about substance use/abuse prevention for healthier homes, schools, and communities.

Violence Prevention: Students will learn how their actions affect others, will understand the power that positive character traits can have in violence prevention, will gain skills to report incidents of violence and hurtful behavior to adults in the school and community, will avoid engaging in violence, and will identify constructive alternatives to violence, including how to discourage others from engaging in violence.

Consumer Health and Resource Management: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain, manage, and evaluate resources to maintain physical and mental health and well being for themselves, their family, and the community.

Ecological Health: Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Community and Public Health: Students will learn the influence of social factors on health, the contribution of public health, and will gain skills to promote health and to collaborate with others to facilitate healthy, safe, and supportive communities.

World Languages

Communication: Interpersonal Communication: Students of modern languages will converse in a language other than English to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students of classical languages will engage in simple oral exchanges and will develop reading skills with discussions of texts conducted in English.

Communication: Interpretive Communication: Students will understand and interpret ideas and information written or spoken in a language other than English. In classical language study, discussion will be conducted in English.

Communication: Presentational Communication: Students of modern languages will write and speak in a language other than English to present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics. Presentations in classical language classes will usually take the form of speaking or writing in English.

Cultures: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the traditions, perspectives, practices, and products of the culture studied, including human commonalities as reflected in history, literature, and the visual and performing arts. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Linguistic Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparison of the language studied with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Cultural Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparison of the target culture with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Connections: Students of modern and classical languages will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge of other disciplines and to acquire new information and knowledge. In classical language study, discussion and presentations will be in English.

Communities: Students will use languages other than English within and beyond the school setting. Students of classical languages will recognize elements of classical languages and ancient cultures in the world around them, and they will share insights derived from their study of classical languages with others within and beyond the classroom setting.

Science

Grade 7: Earth and Space Sciences

Grade 7: Life Science

Grade 7: Physical Science

Grade 7: Technology/Engineering

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Mathematics

Mathematical Practice

Ratios and Proportional Relationships

The Number System

Expressions and Equations

Geometry

Statistics and Probability

Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Grades 6–8 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Studies [RCA-H]

Grades 6–8 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: Science and Career and Technical Subjects [RCA-ST]

Grades 6–8 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [WCA]

Grades 6–8 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [SLCA]

Grade 7 Reading Standards for Literature [RL]

Grade 7 Reading Standards for Informational Text [RI]

Grade 7 Writing Standards [W]

Grade 7 Speaking and Listening Standards [SL]

Grade 7 Language Standards [L]

Technology Education

Grades 6 – 8: Computing and Society (CAS)

Grades 6 – 8: Digital Tools and Collaboration (DTC)

Grades 6 – 8: Computing Systems (CS)

Grades 6 – 8: Computational Thinking (CT)

Social Studies

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

2

Develop focused questions or problem statements and conduct inquiries. The ability to develop focused research questions in history/social science or define the dimensions of a particular policy problem is central to learning in these disciplines. Students learn that each field in the social sciences has its own ways of defining questions. For example, in studying the Great Depression, A political scientist might ask How did the major political parties, government institutions and the private sector respond?; An economist might ask What were the economic causes of the Depression?; A geographer might ask How did the Depression affect areas of the United States differently?; A historian might ask What related economic, political and social events preceded the Depression? This Standard corresponds to Writing Standard 7 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

3

Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

4

Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

5

Evaluate the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source. Students investigating a question using online sources often find all too much material, some of it conflicting. The ability to be discerning and skeptical consumers of information is a crucial college, career, and civic skill. Beginning in elementary school, students should learn how and why to assess, verify, and cite sources. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 8 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

6

Argue or explain conclusions, using valid reasoning and evidence. The strength of an argument or explanation lies in its logical development of ideas, acknowledgement of counterclaims, and use of reliable supporting evidence. Effective arguments and explanations often go beyond text alone to include well-chosen and relevant visual elements such as photographs, maps, and displays of quantitative data. Students’ ability to adapt a presentation to the task, purpose, and audience and their ability to respond to questions are important skills for civic participation. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

7

Determine next steps and take informed action, as appropriate. One of the main goals of teaching history and the social science is to provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that enable them to participate in civic life. Some examples of those opportunities include: Exploring questions or problems in the form of classroom discussions, essays, research papers, and other products of research; Engaging in discourse about public policy beyond the classroom through social media, letters to the editor, oral presentations in public settings, or community service learning projects. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Grades 6-8 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Grades 6-8 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grades 6-8 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grade 7 – World Geography and Ancient Civilizations II

Central and South Asia

East Asia

Southeast Asia and Oceania

Europe

8th

Arts Education

Dance: Movement Elements and Dance Skills: Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and dance skills.

Dance: Choreography: Students will create movement compositions based on choreographic principles, processes, and forms.

Dance: Dance as Expression: Students will demonstrate an understanding of dance as a way to express and communicate meaning.

Dance: Performance in Dance: Students will rehearse and stage dance works.

Dance: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own dances and the dances of others using appropriate dance vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Music: Singing: Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Reading and Notation: Students will read music written in standard notation.

Music: Playing Instruments: Students will play instruments, alone and with others, to perform a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvisation and Composition: Students will improvise, compose, and arrange music.

Music: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own music and the music of others using appropriate music vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Theatre: Acting: Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes.

Theatre: Reading and Writing Scripts: Students will read, analyze, and write dramatic material.

Theatre: Directing: Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works.

Theatre: Technical Theatre: Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production.

Theatre: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own theatrical work and the work of others using appropriate theatre vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Visual Arts: Methods, Materials, and Techniques: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Visual Arts: Elements and Principles of Design: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression: Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

Visual Arts: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

Visual Arts: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Connections: Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, where appropriate, interpret their meanings.

Connections: Roles of Artists in Communities: Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Connections: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of style, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Connections: Inventions, Technologies, and the Arts: Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their works.

Connections: Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will use knowledge of the arts and cultural resources in the study of the arts, English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Health and PE

Growth and Development: Students will learn the basic characteristics of physical growth and development, including body functions and systems throughout the life cycle, and will acquire skills to promote and maintain positive growth and development.

Physical Activity and Fitness: Students will, by repeated practice, acquire and refine a variety of manipulative, locomotor, and non-locomotor movement skills, and will utilize principles of training and conditioning, will learn biomechanics and exercise physiology, and will apply the concept of wellness to their lives.

Nutrition: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Reproduction/Sexuality: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make effective personal decisions that promote their emotional, sexual, and reproductive health.

Mental Health: Students will acquire knowledge about emotions and physical health, the management of emotions, personality and character development, and social awareness; and will learn skills to promote self-acceptance, make decisions, and cope with stress, including suicide prevention.

Family Life: Students will gain knowledge about the significance of the family on individuals and society, and will learn skills to support the family, balance work and family life, be an effective parent, and nurture the development of children.

Interpersonal Relationships: Students will learn that relationships with others are an integral part of the human life experience and the factors that contribute to healthy interpersonal relationships, and will acquire skills to enhance and make many of these relationships more fulfilling through commitment and communication.

Disease Prevention and Control: Students will learn the signs, causes, and treatment of chronic and communicable diseases, and will gain skills related to health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to administer first aid and carry out emergency procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, will avoid, recognize, and report verbal, physical, and emotional abuse situations, and will assess the factors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injury, including motor vehicle accidents, fire safety, and weapons safety.

Tobacco, Alcohol, & Substance Use/Abuse Prevention: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be competent in making health-enhancing decisions regarding the use of medications and avoidance of substances, and in communicating about substance use/abuse prevention for healthier homes, schools, and communities.

Violence Prevention: Students will learn how their actions affect others, will understand the power that positive character traits can have in violence prevention, will gain skills to report incidents of violence and hurtful behavior to adults in the school and community, will avoid engaging in violence, and will identify constructive alternatives to violence, including how to discourage others from engaging in violence.

Consumer Health and Resource Management: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain, manage, and evaluate resources to maintain physical and mental health and well being for themselves, their family, and the community.

Ecological Health: Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Community and Public Health: Students will learn the influence of social factors on health, the contribution of public health, and will gain skills to promote health and to collaborate with others to facilitate healthy, safe, and supportive communities.

World Languages

Communication: Interpersonal Communication: Students of modern languages will converse in a language other than English to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students of classical languages will engage in simple oral exchanges and will develop reading skills with discussions of texts conducted in English.

Communication: Interpretive Communication: Students will understand and interpret ideas and information written or spoken in a language other than English. In classical language study, discussion will be conducted in English.

Communication: Presentational Communication: Students of modern languages will write and speak in a language other than English to present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics. Presentations in classical language classes will usually take the form of speaking or writing in English.

Cultures: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the traditions, perspectives, practices, and products of the culture studied, including human commonalities as reflected in history, literature, and the visual and performing arts. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Linguistic Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparison of the language studied with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Cultural Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparison of the target culture with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Connections: Students of modern and classical languages will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge of other disciplines and to acquire new information and knowledge. In classical language study, discussion and presentations will be in English.

Communities: Students will use languages other than English within and beyond the school setting. Students of classical languages will recognize elements of classical languages and ancient cultures in the world around them, and they will share insights derived from their study of classical languages with others within and beyond the classroom setting.

Science

Grade 8: Earth and Space Sciences

Grade 8: Life Science

Grade 8: Physical Science

Grade 8: Technology/Engineering

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Mathematics

Mathematical Practice

The Number System

Expressions and Equations

Functions

Geometry

Statistics and Probability

Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Grades 6–8 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Studies [RCA-H]

Grades 6–8 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: Science and Career and Technical Subjects [RCA-ST]

Grades 6–8 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [WCA]

Grades 6–8 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [SLCA]

Grade 8 Reading Standards for Literature [RL]

Grade 8 Reading Standards for Informational Text [RI]

Grade 8 Writing Standards [W]

Grade 8 Speaking and Listening Standards [SL]

Grade 8 Language Standards [L]

Technology Education

Grades 6 – 8: Computing and Society (CAS)

Grades 6 – 8: Digital Tools and Collaboration (DTC)

Grades 6 – 8: Computing Systems (CS)

Grades 6 – 8: Computational Thinking (CT)

Social Studies

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

2

Develop focused questions or problem statements and conduct inquiries. The ability to develop focused research questions in history/social science or define the dimensions of a particular policy problem is central to learning in these disciplines. Students learn that each field in the social sciences has its own ways of defining questions. For example, in studying the Great Depression, A political scientist might ask How did the major political parties, government institutions and the private sector respond?; An economist might ask What were the economic causes of the Depression?; A geographer might ask How did the Depression affect areas of the United States differently?; A historian might ask What related economic, political and social events preceded the Depression? This Standard corresponds to Writing Standard 7 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

3

Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

4

Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

5

Evaluate the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source. Students investigating a question using online sources often find all too much material, some of it conflicting. The ability to be discerning and skeptical consumers of information is a crucial college, career, and civic skill. Beginning in elementary school, students should learn how and why to assess, verify, and cite sources. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 8 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

6

Argue or explain conclusions, using valid reasoning and evidence. The strength of an argument or explanation lies in its logical development of ideas, acknowledgement of counterclaims, and use of reliable supporting evidence. Effective arguments and explanations often go beyond text alone to include well-chosen and relevant visual elements such as photographs, maps, and displays of quantitative data. Students’ ability to adapt a presentation to the task, purpose, and audience and their ability to respond to questions are important skills for civic participation. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

7

Determine next steps and take informed action, as appropriate. One of the main goals of teaching history and the social science is to provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that enable them to participate in civic life. Some examples of those opportunities include: Exploring questions or problems in the form of classroom discussions, essays, research papers, and other products of research; Engaging in discourse about public policy beyond the classroom through social media, letters to the editor, oral presentations in public settings, or community service learning projects. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Grades 6-8 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Grades 6-8 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grades 6-8 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grade 8 – United States and Massachusetts Government and Civic Life

The philosophical foundations of the United States political system – Supporting Question: What were the roots of the ideas that influenced the development of the United States political system?

The development of the United States government – Supporting Question: How did the framers of the Constitution attempt to address issues of power and freedom in the design of the new political system?

The institutions of United States government – Supporting Question: How do the institutions of the U.S. political system work?

Rights and responsibilities of citizens – Supporting Question: What is the role of the individual in maintaining a healthy democracy?

The Constitution, Amendments, and Supreme Court decisions – Supporting Question: How has the content and interpretation of the Constitution evolved over time?

The structure of Massachusetts state and local government – Supporting Question: What is the role of state and local government in the U.S. political system?

Freedom of the Press and News/Media Literacy – Supporting Question: How does a free press support a democratic government?

9th

Arts Education

Dance: Movement Elements and Dance Skills: Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and dance skills.

Dance: Choreography: Students will create movement compositions based on choreographic principles, processes, and forms.

Dance: Dance as Expression: Students will demonstrate an understanding of dance as a way to express and communicate meaning.

Dance: Performance in Dance: Students will rehearse and stage dance works.

Dance: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own dances and the dances of others using appropriate dance vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Music: Singing: Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Reading and Notation: Students will read music written in standard notation.

Music: Playing Instruments: Students will play instruments, alone and with others, to perform a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvisation and Composition: Students will improvise, compose, and arrange music.

Music: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own music and the music of others using appropriate music vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Theatre: Acting: Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes.

Theatre: Reading and Writing Scripts: Students will read, analyze, and write dramatic material.

Theatre: Directing: Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works.

Theatre: Technical Theatre: Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production.

Theatre: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own theatrical work and the work of others using appropriate theatre vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Visual Arts: Methods, Materials, and Techniques: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Visual Arts: Elements and Principles of Design: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression: Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

Visual Arts: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

Visual Arts: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Connections: Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, where appropriate, interpret their meanings.

Connections: Roles of Artists in Communities: Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Connections: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of style, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Connections: Inventions, Technologies, and the Arts: Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their works.

Connections: Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will use knowledge of the arts and cultural resources in the study of the arts, English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Health and PE

Growth and Development: Students will learn the basic characteristics of physical growth and development, including body functions and systems throughout the life cycle, and will acquire skills to promote and maintain positive growth and development.

Physical Activity and Fitness: Students will, by repeated practice, acquire and refine a variety of manipulative, locomotor, and non-locomotor movement skills, and will utilize principles of training and conditioning, will learn biomechanics and exercise physiology, and will apply the concept of wellness to their lives.

Nutrition: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Reproduction/Sexuality: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make effective personal decisions that promote their emotional, sexual, and reproductive health.

Mental Health: Students will acquire knowledge about emotions and physical health, the management of emotions, personality and character development, and social awareness; and will learn skills to promote self-acceptance, make decisions, and cope with stress, including suicide prevention.

Family Life: Students will gain knowledge about the significance of the family on individuals and society, and will learn skills to support the family, balance work and family life, be an effective parent, and nurture the development of children.

Interpersonal Relationships: Students will learn that relationships with others are an integral part of the human life experience and the factors that contribute to healthy interpersonal relationships, and will acquire skills to enhance and make many of these relationships more fulfilling through commitment and communication.

Disease Prevention and Control: Students will learn the signs, causes, and treatment of chronic and communicable diseases, and will gain skills related to health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to administer first aid and carry out emergency procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, will avoid, recognize, and report verbal, physical, and emotional abuse situations, and will assess the factors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injury, including motor vehicle accidents, fire safety, and weapons safety.

Tobacco, Alcohol, & Substance Use/Abuse Prevention: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be competent in making health-enhancing decisions regarding the use of medications and avoidance of substances, and in communicating about substance use/abuse prevention for healthier homes, schools, and communities.

Violence Prevention: Students will learn how their actions affect others, will understand the power that positive character traits can have in violence prevention, will gain skills to report incidents of violence and hurtful behavior to adults in the school and community, will avoid engaging in violence, and will identify constructive alternatives to violence, including how to discourage others from engaging in violence.

Consumer Health and Resource Management: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain, manage, and evaluate resources to maintain physical and mental health and well being for themselves, their family, and the community.

MA.13.

Ecological Health: Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Community and Public Health: Students will learn the influence of social factors on health, the contribution of public health, and will gain skills to promote health and to collaborate with others to facilitate healthy, safe, and supportive communities.

World Languages

Communication: Interpersonal Communication: Students of modern languages will converse in a language other than English to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students of classical languages will engage in simple oral exchanges and will develop reading skills with discussions of texts conducted in English.

Communication: Interpretive Communication: Students will understand and interpret ideas and information written or spoken in a language other than English. In classical language study, discussion will be conducted in English.

Communication: Presentational Communication: Students of modern languages will write and speak in a language other than English to present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics. Presentations in classical language classes will usually take the form of speaking or writing in English.

Cultures: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the traditions, perspectives, practices, and products of the culture studied, including human commonalities as reflected in history, literature, and the visual and performing arts. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Linguistic Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparison of the language studied with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Cultural Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparison of the target culture with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Connections: Students of modern and classical languages will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge of other disciplines and to acquire new information and knowledge. In classical language study, discussion and presentations will be in English.

Communities: Students will use languages other than English within and beyond the school setting. Students of classical languages will recognize elements of classical languages and ancient cultures in the world around them, and they will share insights derived from their study of classical languages with others within and beyond the classroom setting.

Science

High School Earth and Space Science

High School Biology

High School Chemistry

High School Introductory Physics

High School Technology/Engineering

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Mathematics

Mathematical Practice

High School Content Standards by Conceptual Categories

Model Algebra I Content Standards [AI]

Model Geometry Content Standards [GEO]

Model Algebra II Content Standards [AII]

Model Mathematics I Content Standards [MI]

Model Mathematics II Content Standards [MII]

Model Mathematics III Content Standards [MIII]

Model Precalculus Content Standards [PC]

Model Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Content Standards [AQR]

Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Grades 9–10 Reading Standards for Literature [RL]

Grades 9–10 Reading Standards for Informational Text [RI]

Grades 9–10 Writing Standards [W]

Grades 9–10 Speaking and Listening Standards [SL]

Grades 9–10 Language Standards [L]

Grades 9–10 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Studies [RCA-H]

Grades 9–10 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: Science and Career and Technical Subjects [RCA-ST]

Grades 9–10 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [WCA]

Grades 9–10 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [SLCA]

Technology Education

Grades 9 – 12: Computing and Society (CAS)

Grades 9 – 12: Digital Tools and Collaboration (DTC)

Grades 9 - 12: Computing Systems (CS)

Grades 9 – 12: Computational Thinking (CT)

Social Studies

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

2

Develop focused questions or problem statements and conduct inquiries. The ability to develop focused research questions in history/social science or define the dimensions of a particular policy problem is central to learning in these disciplines. Students learn that each field in the social sciences has its own ways of defining questions. For example, in studying the Great Depression, A political scientist might ask How did the major political parties, government institutions and the private sector respond?; An economist might ask What were the economic causes of the Depression?; A geographer might ask How did the Depression affect areas of the United States differently?; A historian might ask What related economic, political and social events preceded the Depression? This Standard corresponds to Writing Standard 7 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

3

Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

4

Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

5

Evaluate the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source. Students investigating a question using online sources often find all too much material, some of it conflicting. The ability to be discerning and skeptical consumers of information is a crucial college, career, and civic skill. Beginning in elementary school, students should learn how and why to assess, verify, and cite sources. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 8 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

6

Argue or explain conclusions, using valid reasoning and evidence. The strength of an argument or explanation lies in its logical development of ideas, acknowledgement of counterclaims, and use of reliable supporting evidence. Effective arguments and explanations often go beyond text alone to include well-chosen and relevant visual elements such as photographs, maps, and displays of quantitative data. Students’ ability to adapt a presentation to the task, purpose, and audience and their ability to respond to questions are important skills for civic participation. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

7

Determine next steps and take informed action, as appropriate. One of the main goals of teaching history and the social science is to provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that enable them to participate in civic life. Some examples of those opportunities include: Exploring questions or problems in the form of classroom discussions, essays, research papers, and other products of research; Engaging in discourse about public policy beyond the classroom through social media, letters to the editor, oral presentations in public settings, or community service learning projects. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Grades 9-10 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Grades 9-10 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grades 9-10 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

High School – United States History I

Origins of the Revolution and the Constitution – Supporting Question: How did events of the Revolutionary period inform the ideas in the Constitution?

Democratization and expansion – Supporting Question: How was the balance of Federal and state authority tested in the early Republic?

Economic growth in the North, South, and West – Supporting Question: How were the North, South, and West interdependent in the antebellum period?

Social, political, and religious change – Supporting Question: How did religious and ethical beliefs shape American reform movements?

The Civil War and Reconstruction: causes and consequences – Supporting Question: How did sectional differences over slavery in the North, South, Midwest, and West contribute to the Civil War?

Rebuilding the United States: industry and immigration – Supporting Question: Industrialists have been called “Captains of Industry” and “Robber Barons.” Which title is more appropriate for them and why?

Progressivism and World War I

High School – United States History II

The role of economics in modern United States history

Modernity in the United States: ideologies and economies – Supporting Question: How did the United States respond to new ideas about society?

Defending Democracy: Responses to fascism and communism – Supporting Question: What kind of a role should the U.S. play in world affairs?

Defending Democracy: the Cold War and Civil Rights at Home – Supporting Question: How did the U.S. government respond to challenges to freedom at home during the Cold War?

United States and globalization – Supporting Questions: How does globalization affect the United States? How can Americans use the Constitution to unite the nation?

High School – World History I

Dynamic interactions among regions of the world – Supporting Question: What kinds of global connections existed among humans in the past?

Development and diffusion of religions and systems of belief c. 500 BCE-1200 CE – Supporting Question: How did the development of religions and belief systems influence the political and cultural structures of the regions where they were produced?

Interactions of kingdoms and empires c. 1000-1500 – Supporting Question: How did the interactions of kingdoms and empires in this time period influence political, economic, and social developments?

Philosophy, the arts, science and technology c. 1200 to 1700 – Supporting Question: How did increasing global connectedness in the world lead to the developments in philosophy, arts and sciences in the early modern world?

Global exploration, conquest, colonization, c. 1492-1800 – Supporting Question: What was the effect of European conquests on the political and social structures of other regions of the world?

Philosophies of government and society – Supporting Question: How did philosophies of government shape the everyday lives of people?

High School – World History II

Absolute power, political revolutions, and the growth of nation states, c. 1700-1900 – Supporting Question: What are the similarities and differences of political revolutions in this period?

The Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions in Europe and social and political reactions in Europe – Supporting Question: In what ways did the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions bring improvements as well as new challenges in Europe and the United States?

The global effects of 19th century imperialism – Supporting Question: What factors led to European imperial ambitions?

The Great Wars, 1914-1945 – Supporting Question: What were the causes and consequences of the 20th century’s two world wars?

The Cold War Era, 1945-1991 – Supporting Question: How did the Cold War manifest itself in conflicts and shifting alliances in the second half of the 20th century?

The era of globalization 1991-present – Supporting Question: What are the factors that brought about globalization in the 21st century?

The politics of difference among people: conflicts, genocide, and terrorism – Supporting Question: How and why do people use difference to foment conflict?

High School Elective – United States Government and Politics

Building on knowledge from previous years, students should be able to:

Foundations of government in the United States – Supporting Question: How has the nation acted to narrow discrepancies between the founding ideals and reality?

Purposes, principles, and institutions of government in the United States – Supporting Question: How are the founding principles reflected in contemporary debates over the role of government?

Civil rights, human rights, and civil liberties – Supporting Question: How have court decisions defined the balance between broader national or community interests and the rights of the individual?

Political parties, interest groups, media, and public policy – Supporting Question: What are the roles of political parties, interest groups, and media in influencing public policy?

The relationship of the United States to other nations in world affairs – Supporting Question: How does the U.S. exercise power in world affairs?

High School Elective – Economics

Scarcity and economic reasoning – Supporting Question: How do individuals and corporations make choices about saving or spending?

Supply and Demand – Supporting Question: What factors affect the prices of goods and services?

Market structures – Supporting Question: What impact does competition have on businesses?

The role of government – Supporting Question: What is government’s responsibility in providing for social needs?

National economic performance – Supporting Question: What factors affect patterns of income distribution in the United States?

Money and the role of financial institutions – Supporting Question: Why are banks and stock markets regulated by the government?

Trade – Supporting Question: Why are the costs and benefits of trade agreements among nations?

High School Standards for Personal Financial Literacy

Earning and spending income – Supporting Question: What is the most important thing to look for in a job?

Saving money – Supporting Question: What can banks do for consumers?

Using credit and making investments – Supporting Question: What are the benefits and risks of using credit and investing?

Protecting and insuring assets – Supporting Question: How does an individual decide if insurance is worth its costs?

High School Standards for News/Media Literacy

Freedom of the press and news/media literacy – Supporting Question: Why does news/media literacy matter?

History of journalism – Supporting Question: How has journalism affected past and present society?

The challenges of news/media literacy in contemporary society – Supporting Question: How have developments in the Digital Age and in the structure of media organizations redefined what it means to be an informed participant in civic life?

Analyzing the news and other media – Supporting Question: How can individuals become informed consumers of news and media?

Gathering and reporting information, using digital media – Supporting Question: How do media literacy skills apply to generating news reporting and other content across all types of media?

10th

Arts Education

Dance: Movement Elements and Dance Skills: Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and dance skills.

Dance: Choreography: Students will create movement compositions based on choreographic principles, processes, and forms.

Dance: Dance as Expression: Students will demonstrate an understanding of dance as a way to express and communicate meaning.

Dance: Performance in Dance: Students will rehearse and stage dance works.

Dance: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own dances and the dances of others using appropriate dance vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Music: Singing: Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Reading and Notation: Students will read music written in standard notation.

Music: Playing Instruments: Students will play instruments, alone and with others, to perform a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvisation and Composition: Students will improvise, compose, and arrange music.

Music: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own music and the music of others using appropriate music vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Theatre: Acting: Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes.

Theatre: Reading and Writing Scripts: Students will read, analyze, and write dramatic material.

Theatre: Directing: Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works.

Theatre: Technical Theatre: Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production.

Theatre: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own theatrical work and the work of others using appropriate theatre vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Visual Arts: Methods, Materials, and Techniques: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Visual Arts: Elements and Principles of Design: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression: Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

Visual Arts: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

Visual Arts: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Connections: Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, where appropriate, interpret their meanings.

Connections: Roles of Artists in Communities: Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Connections: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of style, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Connections: Inventions, Technologies, and the Arts: Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their works.

Connections: Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will use knowledge of the arts and cultural resources in the study of the arts, English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Health and PE

Growth and Development: Students will learn the basic characteristics of physical growth and development, including body functions and systems throughout the life cycle, and will acquire skills to promote and maintain positive growth and development.

Physical Activity and Fitness: Students will, by repeated practice, acquire and refine a variety of manipulative, locomotor, and non-locomotor movement skills, and will utilize principles of training and conditioning, will learn biomechanics and exercise physiology, and will apply the concept of wellness to their lives.

Nutrition: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Reproduction/Sexuality: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make effective personal decisions that promote their emotional, sexual, and reproductive health.

Mental Health: Students will acquire knowledge about emotions and physical health, the management of emotions, personality and character development, and social awareness; and will learn skills to promote self-acceptance, make decisions, and cope with stress, including suicide prevention.

Family Life: Students will gain knowledge about the significance of the family on individuals and society, and will learn skills to support the family, balance work and family life, be an effective parent, and nurture the development of children.

Interpersonal Relationships: Students will learn that relationships with others are an integral part of the human life experience and the factors that contribute to healthy interpersonal relationships, and will acquire skills to enhance and make many of these relationships more fulfilling through commitment and communication.

Disease Prevention and Control: Students will learn the signs, causes, and treatment of chronic and communicable diseases, and will gain skills related to health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to administer first aid and carry out emergency procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, will avoid, recognize, and report verbal, physical, and emotional abuse situations, and will assess the factors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injury, including motor vehicle accidents, fire safety, and weapons safety.

Tobacco, Alcohol, & Substance Use/Abuse Prevention: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be competent in making health-enhancing decisions regarding the use of medications and avoidance of substances, and in communicating about substance use/abuse prevention for healthier homes, schools, and communities.

Violence Prevention: Students will learn how their actions affect others, will understand the power that positive character traits can have in violence prevention, will gain skills to report incidents of violence and hurtful behavior to adults in the school and community, will avoid engaging in violence, and will identify constructive alternatives to violence, including how to discourage others from engaging in violence.

Consumer Health and Resource Management: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain, manage, and evaluate resources to maintain physical and mental health and well being for themselves, their family, and the community.

MA.13.

Ecological Health: Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Community and Public Health: Students will learn the influence of social factors on health, the contribution of public health, and will gain skills to promote health and to collaborate with others to facilitate healthy, safe, and supportive communities.

World Languages

Communication: Interpersonal Communication: Students of modern languages will converse in a language other than English to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students of classical languages will engage in simple oral exchanges and will develop reading skills with discussions of texts conducted in English.

Communication: Interpretive Communication: Students will understand and interpret ideas and information written or spoken in a language other than English. In classical language study, discussion will be conducted in English.

Communication: Presentational Communication: Students of modern languages will write and speak in a language other than English to present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics. Presentations in classical language classes will usually take the form of speaking or writing in English.

Cultures: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the traditions, perspectives, practices, and products of the culture studied, including human commonalities as reflected in history, literature, and the visual and performing arts. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Linguistic Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparison of the language studied with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Cultural Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparison of the target culture with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Connections: Students of modern and classical languages will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge of other disciplines and to acquire new information and knowledge. In classical language study, discussion and presentations will be in English.

Communities: Students will use languages other than English within and beyond the school setting. Students of classical languages will recognize elements of classical languages and ancient cultures in the world around them, and they will share insights derived from their study of classical languages with others within and beyond the classroom setting.

Science

High School Earth and Space Science

High School Biology

High School Chemistry

High School Introductory Physics

High School Technology/Engineering

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Mathematics

Mathematical Practice

High School Content Standards by Conceptual Categories

Model Algebra I Content Standards [AI]

Model Geometry Content Standards [GEO]

Model Algebra II Content Standards [AII]

Model Mathematics I Content Standards [MI]

Model Mathematics II Content Standards [MII]

Model Mathematics III Content Standards [MIII]

Model Precalculus Content Standards [PC]

Model Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Content Standards [AQR]

Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Grades 9–10 Reading Standards for Literature [RL]

Grades 9–10 Reading Standards for Informational Text [RI]

Grades 9–10 Writing Standards [W]

Grades 9–10 Speaking and Listening Standards [SL]

Grades 9–10 Language Standards [L]

Grades 9–10 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Studies [RCA-H]

Grades 9–10 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: Science and Career and Technical Subjects [RCA-ST]

Grades 9–10 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [WCA]

Grades 9–10 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [SLCA]

Technology Education

Grades 9 – 12: Computing and Society (CAS)

Grades 9 – 12: Digital Tools and Collaboration (DTC)

Grades 9 - 12: Computing Systems (CS)

Grades 9 – 12: Computational Thinking (CT)

Social Studies

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

2

Develop focused questions or problem statements and conduct inquiries. The ability to develop focused research questions in history/social science or define the dimensions of a particular policy problem is central to learning in these disciplines. Students learn that each field in the social sciences has its own ways of defining questions. For example, in studying the Great Depression, A political scientist might ask How did the major political parties, government institutions and the private sector respond?; An economist might ask What were the economic causes of the Depression?; A geographer might ask How did the Depression affect areas of the United States differently?; A historian might ask What related economic, political and social events preceded the Depression? This Standard corresponds to Writing Standard 7 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

3

Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

4

Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

5

Evaluate the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source. Students investigating a question using online sources often find all too much material, some of it conflicting. The ability to be discerning and skeptical consumers of information is a crucial college, career, and civic skill. Beginning in elementary school, students should learn how and why to assess, verify, and cite sources. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 8 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

6

Argue or explain conclusions, using valid reasoning and evidence. The strength of an argument or explanation lies in its logical development of ideas, acknowledgement of counterclaims, and use of reliable supporting evidence. Effective arguments and explanations often go beyond text alone to include well-chosen and relevant visual elements such as photographs, maps, and displays of quantitative data. Students’ ability to adapt a presentation to the task, purpose, and audience and their ability to respond to questions are important skills for civic participation. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

7

Determine next steps and take informed action, as appropriate. One of the main goals of teaching history and the social science is to provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that enable them to participate in civic life. Some examples of those opportunities include: Exploring questions or problems in the form of classroom discussions, essays, research papers, and other products of research; Engaging in discourse about public policy beyond the classroom through social media, letters to the editor, oral presentations in public settings, or community service learning projects. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Grades 9-10 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Grades 9-10 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grades 9-10 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

High School – United States History I

Origins of the Revolution and the Constitution – Supporting Question: How did events of the Revolutionary period inform the ideas in the Constitution?

Democratization and expansion – Supporting Question: How was the balance of Federal and state authority tested in the early Republic?

Economic growth in the North, South, and West – Supporting Question: How were the North, South, and West interdependent in the antebellum period?

Social, political, and religious change – Supporting Question: How did religious and ethical beliefs shape American reform movements?

The Civil War and Reconstruction: causes and consequences – Supporting Question: How did sectional differences over slavery in the North, South, Midwest, and West contribute to the Civil War?

Rebuilding the United States: industry and immigration – Supporting Question: Industrialists have been called “Captains of Industry” and “Robber Barons.” Which title is more appropriate for them and why?

Progressivism and World War I

High School – United States History II

The role of economics in modern United States history

Modernity in the United States: ideologies and economies – Supporting Question: How did the United States respond to new ideas about society?

Defending Democracy: Responses to fascism and communism – Supporting Question: What kind of a role should the U.S. play in world affairs?

Defending Democracy: the Cold War and Civil Rights at Home – Supporting Question: How did the U.S. government respond to challenges to freedom at home during the Cold War?

United States and globalization – Supporting Questions: How does globalization affect the United States? How can Americans use the Constitution to unite the nation?

High School – World History I

Dynamic interactions among regions of the world – Supporting Question: What kinds of global connections existed among humans in the past?

Development and diffusion of religions and systems of belief c. 500 BCE-1200 CE – Supporting Question: How did the development of religions and belief systems influence the political and cultural structures of the regions where they were produced?

Interactions of kingdoms and empires c. 1000-1500 – Supporting Question: How did the interactions of kingdoms and empires in this time period influence political, economic, and social developments?

Philosophy, the arts, science and technology c. 1200 to 1700 – Supporting Question: How did increasing global connectedness in the world lead to the developments in philosophy, arts and sciences in the early modern world?

Global exploration, conquest, colonization, c. 1492-1800 – Supporting Question: What was the effect of European conquests on the political and social structures of other regions of the world?

Philosophies of government and society – Supporting Question: How did philosophies of government shape the everyday lives of people?

High School – World History II

Absolute power, political revolutions, and the growth of nation states, c. 1700-1900 – Supporting Question: What are the similarities and differences of political revolutions in this period?

The Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions in Europe and social and political reactions in Europe – Supporting Question: In what ways did the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions bring improvements as well as new challenges in Europe and the United States?

The global effects of 19th century imperialism – Supporting Question: What factors led to European imperial ambitions?

The Great Wars, 1914-1945 – Supporting Question: What were the causes and consequences of the 20th century’s two world wars?

The Cold War Era, 1945-1991 – Supporting Question: How did the Cold War manifest itself in conflicts and shifting alliances in the second half of the 20th century?

The era of globalization 1991-present – Supporting Question: What are the factors that brought about globalization in the 21st century?

The politics of difference among people: conflicts, genocide, and terrorism – Supporting Question: How and why do people use difference to foment conflict?

High School Elective – United States Government and Politics

Building on knowledge from previous years, students should be able to:

Foundations of government in the United States – Supporting Question: How has the nation acted to narrow discrepancies between the founding ideals and reality?

Purposes, principles, and institutions of government in the United States – Supporting Question: How are the founding principles reflected in contemporary debates over the role of government?

Civil rights, human rights, and civil liberties – Supporting Question: How have court decisions defined the balance between broader national or community interests and the rights of the individual?

Political parties, interest groups, media, and public policy – Supporting Question: What are the roles of political parties, interest groups, and media in influencing public policy?

The relationship of the United States to other nations in world affairs – Supporting Question: How does the U.S. exercise power in world affairs?

High School Elective – Economics

Scarcity and economic reasoning – Supporting Question: How do individuals and corporations make choices about saving or spending?

Supply and Demand – Supporting Question: What factors affect the prices of goods and services?

Market structures – Supporting Question: What impact does competition have on businesses?

The role of government – Supporting Question: What is government’s responsibility in providing for social needs?

National economic performance – Supporting Question: What factors affect patterns of income distribution in the United States?

Money and the role of financial institutions – Supporting Question: Why are banks and stock markets regulated by the government?

Trade – Supporting Question: Why are the costs and benefits of trade agreements among nations?

High School Standards for Personal Financial Literacy

Earning and spending income – Supporting Question: What is the most important thing to look for in a job?

Saving money – Supporting Question: What can banks do for consumers?

Using credit and making investments – Supporting Question: What are the benefits and risks of using credit and investing?

Protecting and insuring assets – Supporting Question: How does an individual decide if insurance is worth its costs?

High School Standards for News/Media Literacy

Freedom of the press and news/media literacy – Supporting Question: Why does news/media literacy matter?

History of journalism – Supporting Question: How has journalism affected past and present society?

The challenges of news/media literacy in contemporary society – Supporting Question: How have developments in the Digital Age and in the structure of media organizations redefined what it means to be an informed participant in civic life?

Analyzing the news and other media – Supporting Question: How can individuals become informed consumers of news and media?

Gathering and reporting information, using digital media – Supporting Question: How do media literacy skills apply to generating news reporting and other content across all types of media?

11th

Arts Education

Dance: Movement Elements and Dance Skills: Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and dance skills.

Dance: Choreography: Students will create movement compositions based on choreographic principles, processes, and forms.

Dance: Dance as Expression: Students will demonstrate an understanding of dance as a way to express and communicate meaning.

Dance: Performance in Dance: Students will rehearse and stage dance works.

Dance: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own dances and the dances of others using appropriate dance vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Music: Singing: Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Reading and Notation: Students will read music written in standard notation.

Music: Playing Instruments: Students will play instruments, alone and with others, to perform a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvisation and Composition: Students will improvise, compose, and arrange music.

Music: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own music and the music of others using appropriate music vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Theatre: Acting: Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes.

Theatre: Reading and Writing Scripts: Students will read, analyze, and write dramatic material.

Theatre: Directing: Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works.

Theatre: Technical Theatre: Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production.

Theatre: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own theatrical work and the work of others using appropriate theatre vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Visual Arts: Methods, Materials, and Techniques: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Visual Arts: Elements and Principles of Design: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression: Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

Visual Arts: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

Visual Arts: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Connections: Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, where appropriate, interpret their meanings.

Connections: Roles of Artists in Communities: Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Connections: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of style, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Connections: Inventions, Technologies, and the Arts: Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their works.

Connections: Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will use knowledge of the arts and cultural resources in the study of the arts, English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Health and PE

Growth and Development: Students will learn the basic characteristics of physical growth and development, including body functions and systems throughout the life cycle, and will acquire skills to promote and maintain positive growth and development.

Physical Activity and Fitness: Students will, by repeated practice, acquire and refine a variety of manipulative, locomotor, and non-locomotor movement skills, and will utilize principles of training and conditioning, will learn biomechanics and exercise physiology, and will apply the concept of wellness to their lives.

Nutrition: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Reproduction/Sexuality: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make effective personal decisions that promote their emotional, sexual, and reproductive health.

Mental Health: Students will acquire knowledge about emotions and physical health, the management of emotions, personality and character development, and social awareness; and will learn skills to promote self-acceptance, make decisions, and cope with stress, including suicide prevention.

Family Life: Students will gain knowledge about the significance of the family on individuals and society, and will learn skills to support the family, balance work and family life, be an effective parent, and nurture the development of children.

Interpersonal Relationships: Students will learn that relationships with others are an integral part of the human life experience and the factors that contribute to healthy interpersonal relationships, and will acquire skills to enhance and make many of these relationships more fulfilling through commitment and communication.

Disease Prevention and Control: Students will learn the signs, causes, and treatment of chronic and communicable diseases, and will gain skills related to health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to administer first aid and carry out emergency procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, will avoid, recognize, and report verbal, physical, and emotional abuse situations, and will assess the factors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injury, including motor vehicle accidents, fire safety, and weapons safety.

Tobacco, Alcohol, & Substance Use/Abuse Prevention: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be competent in making health-enhancing decisions regarding the use of medications and avoidance of substances, and in communicating about substance use/abuse prevention for healthier homes, schools, and communities.

Violence Prevention: Students will learn how their actions affect others, will understand the power that positive character traits can have in violence prevention, will gain skills to report incidents of violence and hurtful behavior to adults in the school and community, will avoid engaging in violence, and will identify constructive alternatives to violence, including how to discourage others from engaging in violence.

Consumer Health and Resource Management: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain, manage, and evaluate resources to maintain physical and mental health and well being for themselves, their family, and the community.

MA.13.

Ecological Health: Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Community and Public Health: Students will learn the influence of social factors on health, the contribution of public health, and will gain skills to promote health and to collaborate with others to facilitate healthy, safe, and supportive communities.

World Languages

Communication: Interpersonal Communication: Students of modern languages will converse in a language other than English to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students of classical languages will engage in simple oral exchanges and will develop reading skills with discussions of texts conducted in English.

Communication: Interpretive Communication: Students will understand and interpret ideas and information written or spoken in a language other than English. In classical language study, discussion will be conducted in English.

Communication: Presentational Communication: Students of modern languages will write and speak in a language other than English to present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics. Presentations in classical language classes will usually take the form of speaking or writing in English.

Cultures: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the traditions, perspectives, practices, and products of the culture studied, including human commonalities as reflected in history, literature, and the visual and performing arts. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Linguistic Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparison of the language studied with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Cultural Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparison of the target culture with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Connections: Students of modern and classical languages will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge of other disciplines and to acquire new information and knowledge. In classical language study, discussion and presentations will be in English.

Communities: Students will use languages other than English within and beyond the school setting. Students of classical languages will recognize elements of classical languages and ancient cultures in the world around them, and they will share insights derived from their study of classical languages with others within and beyond the classroom setting.

Science

High School Earth and Space Science

High School Biology

High School Chemistry

High School Introductory Physics

High School Technology/Engineering

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Mathematics

Mathematical Practice

High School Content Standards by Conceptual Categories

Model Algebra I Content Standards [AI]

Model Geometry Content Standards [GEO]

Model Algebra II Content Standards [AII]

Model Mathematics I Content Standards [MI]

Model Mathematics II Content Standards [MII]

Model Mathematics III Content Standards [MIII]

Model Precalculus Content Standards [PC]

Model Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Content Standards [AQR]

Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Grades 11–12 Reading Standards for Literature [RL]

Grades 11–12 Reading Standards for Informational Text [RI]

Grades 11–12 Writing Standards [W]

Grades 11–12 Speaking and Listening Standards [SL]

Grades 11–12 Language [L]

Grades 11–12 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Studies [RCA-H]

Grades 11–12 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: Science and Career and Technical Subjects [RCA-ST]

Grades 11–12 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [WCA]

Grades 11–12 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [SLCA]

Technology Education

Grades 9 – 12: Computing and Society (CAS)

Grades 9 – 12: Digital Tools and Collaboration (DTC)

Grades 9 - 12: Computing Systems (CS)

Grades 9 – 12: Computational Thinking (CT)

Social Studies

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

2

Develop focused questions or problem statements and conduct inquiries. The ability to develop focused research questions in history/social science or define the dimensions of a particular policy problem is central to learning in these disciplines. Students learn that each field in the social sciences has its own ways of defining questions. For example, in studying the Great Depression, A political scientist might ask How did the major political parties, government institutions and the private sector respond?; An economist might ask What were the economic causes of the Depression?; A geographer might ask How did the Depression affect areas of the United States differently?; A historian might ask What related economic, political and social events preceded the Depression? This Standard corresponds to Writing Standard 7 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

3

Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

4

Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

5

Evaluate the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source. Students investigating a question using online sources often find all too much material, some of it conflicting. The ability to be discerning and skeptical consumers of information is a crucial college, career, and civic skill. Beginning in elementary school, students should learn how and why to assess, verify, and cite sources. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 8 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

6

Argue or explain conclusions, using valid reasoning and evidence. The strength of an argument or explanation lies in its logical development of ideas, acknowledgement of counterclaims, and use of reliable supporting evidence. Effective arguments and explanations often go beyond text alone to include well-chosen and relevant visual elements such as photographs, maps, and displays of quantitative data. Students’ ability to adapt a presentation to the task, purpose, and audience and their ability to respond to questions are important skills for civic participation. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

7

Determine next steps and take informed action, as appropriate. One of the main goals of teaching history and the social science is to provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that enable them to participate in civic life. Some examples of those opportunities include: Exploring questions or problems in the form of classroom discussions, essays, research papers, and other products of research; Engaging in discourse about public policy beyond the classroom through social media, letters to the editor, oral presentations in public settings, or community service learning projects. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Grades 11-12 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Grades 11-12 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grades 11-12 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

High School – United States History I

Origins of the Revolution and the Constitution – Supporting Question: How did events of the Revolutionary period inform the ideas in the Constitution?

Democratization and expansion – Supporting Question: How was the balance of Federal and state authority tested in the early Republic?

Economic growth in the North, South, and West – Supporting Question: How were the North, South, and West interdependent in the antebellum period?

Social, political, and religious change – Supporting Question: How did religious and ethical beliefs shape American reform movements?

The Civil War and Reconstruction: causes and consequences – Supporting Question: How did sectional differences over slavery in the North, South, Midwest, and West contribute to the Civil War?

Rebuilding the United States: industry and immigration – Supporting Question: Industrialists have been called “Captains of Industry” and “Robber Barons.” Which title is more appropriate for them and why?

Progressivism and World War I

High School – United States History II

The role of economics in modern United States history

Modernity in the United States: ideologies and economies – Supporting Question: How did the United States respond to new ideas about society?

Defending Democracy: Responses to fascism and communism – Supporting Question: What kind of a role should the U.S. play in world affairs?

Defending Democracy: the Cold War and Civil Rights at Home – Supporting Question: How did the U.S. government respond to challenges to freedom at home during the Cold War?

United States and globalization – Supporting Questions: How does globalization affect the United States? How can Americans use the Constitution to unite the nation?

High School – World History I

Dynamic interactions among regions of the world – Supporting Question: What kinds of global connections existed among humans in the past?

Development and diffusion of religions and systems of belief c. 500 BCE-1200 CE – Supporting Question: How did the development of religions and belief systems influence the political and cultural structures of the regions where they were produced?

Interactions of kingdoms and empires c. 1000-1500 – Supporting Question: How did the interactions of kingdoms and empires in this time period influence political, economic, and social developments?

Philosophy, the arts, science and technology c. 1200 to 1700 – Supporting Question: How did increasing global connectedness in the world lead to the developments in philosophy, arts and sciences in the early modern world?

Global exploration, conquest, colonization, c. 1492-1800 – Supporting Question: What was the effect of European conquests on the political and social structures of other regions of the world?

Philosophies of government and society – Supporting Question: How did philosophies of government shape the everyday lives of people?

High School – World History II

Absolute power, political revolutions, and the growth of nation states, c. 1700-1900 – Supporting Question: What are the similarities and differences of political revolutions in this period?

The Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions in Europe and social and political reactions in Europe – Supporting Question: In what ways did the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions bring improvements as well as new challenges in Europe and the United States?

The global effects of 19th century imperialism – Supporting Question: What factors led to European imperial ambitions?

The Great Wars, 1914-1945 – Supporting Question: What were the causes and consequences of the 20th century’s two world wars?

The Cold War Era, 1945-1991 – Supporting Question: How did the Cold War manifest itself in conflicts and shifting alliances in the second half of the 20th century?

The era of globalization 1991-present – Supporting Question: What are the factors that brought about globalization in the 21st century?

The politics of difference among people: conflicts, genocide, and terrorism – Supporting Question: How and why do people use difference to foment conflict?

High School Elective – United States Government and Politics

Building on knowledge from previous years, students should be able to:

Foundations of government in the United States – Supporting Question: How has the nation acted to narrow discrepancies between the founding ideals and reality?

Purposes, principles, and institutions of government in the United States – Supporting Question: How are the founding principles reflected in contemporary debates over the role of government?

Civil rights, human rights, and civil liberties – Supporting Question: How have court decisions defined the balance between broader national or community interests and the rights of the individual?

Political parties, interest groups, media, and public policy – Supporting Question: What are the roles of political parties, interest groups, and media in influencing public policy?

The relationship of the United States to other nations in world affairs – Supporting Question: How does the U.S. exercise power in world affairs?

High School Elective – Economics

Scarcity and economic reasoning – Supporting Question: How do individuals and corporations make choices about saving or spending?

Supply and Demand – Supporting Question: What factors affect the prices of goods and services?

Market structures – Supporting Question: What impact does competition have on businesses?

The role of government – Supporting Question: What is government’s responsibility in providing for social needs?

National economic performance – Supporting Question: What factors affect patterns of income distribution in the United States?

Money and the role of financial institutions – Supporting Question: Why are banks and stock markets regulated by the government?

Trade – Supporting Question: Why are the costs and benefits of trade agreements among nations?

High School Standards for Personal Financial Literacy

Earning and spending income – Supporting Question: What is the most important thing to look for in a job?

Saving money – Supporting Question: What can banks do for consumers?

Using credit and making investments – Supporting Question: What are the benefits and risks of using credit and investing?

Protecting and insuring assets – Supporting Question: How does an individual decide if insurance is worth its costs?

High School Standards for News/Media Literacy

Freedom of the press and news/media literacy – Supporting Question: Why does news/media literacy matter?

History of journalism – Supporting Question: How has journalism affected past and present society?

The challenges of news/media literacy in contemporary society – Supporting Question: How have developments in the Digital Age and in the structure of media organizations redefined what it means to be an informed participant in civic life?

Analyzing the news and other media – Supporting Question: How can individuals become informed consumers of news and media?

Gathering and reporting information, using digital media – Supporting Question: How do media literacy skills apply to generating news reporting and other content across all types of media?

12th

Arts Education

Dance: Movement Elements and Dance Skills: Students will identify and demonstrate movement elements and dance skills.

Dance: Choreography: Students will create movement compositions based on choreographic principles, processes, and forms.

Dance: Dance as Expression: Students will demonstrate an understanding of dance as a way to express and communicate meaning.

Dance: Performance in Dance: Students will rehearse and stage dance works.

Dance: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own dances and the dances of others using appropriate dance vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Music: Singing: Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Reading and Notation: Students will read music written in standard notation.

Music: Playing Instruments: Students will play instruments, alone and with others, to perform a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvisation and Composition: Students will improvise, compose, and arrange music.

Music: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own music and the music of others using appropriate music vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Theatre: Acting: Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes.

Theatre: Reading and Writing Scripts: Students will read, analyze, and write dramatic material.

Theatre: Directing: Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works.

Theatre: Technical Theatre: Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production.

Theatre: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own theatrical work and the work of others using appropriate theatre vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Visual Arts: Methods, Materials, and Techniques: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods, materials, and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Visual Arts: Elements and Principles of Design: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression: Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in a variety of media, materials, and techniques.

Visual Arts: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting their own artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation.

Visual Arts: Critical Response: Students will describe and analyze their own work and the work of others using appropriate visual arts vocabulary. When appropriate, students will connect their analysis to interpretation and evaluation.

Connections: Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, where appropriate, interpret their meanings.

Connections: Roles of Artists in Communities: Students will describe the roles of artists, patrons, cultural organizations, and arts institutions in societies of the past and present.

Connections: Concepts of Style, Stylistic Influence, and Stylistic Change: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the concepts of style, stylistic influence, and stylistic change by identifying when and where art works were created and by analyzing characteristic features of art works from various historical periods, cultures, and genres.

Connections: Inventions, Technologies, and the Arts: Students will describe and analyze how performing and visual artists use and have used materials, inventions, and technologies in their works.

Connections: Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will use knowledge of the arts and cultural resources in the study of the arts, English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

Health and PE

Growth and Development: Students will learn the basic characteristics of physical growth and development, including body functions and systems throughout the life cycle, and will acquire skills to promote and maintain positive growth and development.

Physical Activity and Fitness: Students will, by repeated practice, acquire and refine a variety of manipulative, locomotor, and non-locomotor movement skills, and will utilize principles of training and conditioning, will learn biomechanics and exercise physiology, and will apply the concept of wellness to their lives.

Nutrition: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to select a diet that supports health and reduces the risk of illness and future chronic diseases.

Reproduction/Sexuality: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make effective personal decisions that promote their emotional, sexual, and reproductive health.

Mental Health: Students will acquire knowledge about emotions and physical health, the management of emotions, personality and character development, and social awareness; and will learn skills to promote self-acceptance, make decisions, and cope with stress, including suicide prevention.

Family Life: Students will gain knowledge about the significance of the family on individuals and society, and will learn skills to support the family, balance work and family life, be an effective parent, and nurture the development of children.

Interpersonal Relationships: Students will learn that relationships with others are an integral part of the human life experience and the factors that contribute to healthy interpersonal relationships, and will acquire skills to enhance and make many of these relationships more fulfilling through commitment and communication.

Disease Prevention and Control: Students will learn the signs, causes, and treatment of chronic and communicable diseases, and will gain skills related to health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Students will gain the knowledge and skills to administer first aid and carry out emergency procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, will avoid, recognize, and report verbal, physical, and emotional abuse situations, and will assess the factors that contribute to intentional and unintentional injury, including motor vehicle accidents, fire safety, and weapons safety.

Tobacco, Alcohol, & Substance Use/Abuse Prevention: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be competent in making health-enhancing decisions regarding the use of medications and avoidance of substances, and in communicating about substance use/abuse prevention for healthier homes, schools, and communities.

Violence Prevention: Students will learn how their actions affect others, will understand the power that positive character traits can have in violence prevention, will gain skills to report incidents of violence and hurtful behavior to adults in the school and community, will avoid engaging in violence, and will identify constructive alternatives to violence, including how to discourage others from engaging in violence.

Consumer Health and Resource Management: Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain, manage, and evaluate resources to maintain physical and mental health and well being for themselves, their family, and the community.

MA.13.

Ecological Health: Students will gain knowledge of the interdependence between the environment and physical health, and will acquire skills to care for the environment.

Community and Public Health: Students will learn the influence of social factors on health, the contribution of public health, and will gain skills to promote health and to collaborate with others to facilitate healthy, safe, and supportive communities.

World Languages

Communication: Interpersonal Communication: Students of modern languages will converse in a language other than English to provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Students of classical languages will engage in simple oral exchanges and will develop reading skills with discussions of texts conducted in English.

Communication: Interpretive Communication: Students will understand and interpret ideas and information written or spoken in a language other than English. In classical language study, discussion will be conducted in English.

Communication: Presentational Communication: Students of modern languages will write and speak in a language other than English to present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics. Presentations in classical language classes will usually take the form of speaking or writing in English.

Cultures: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the traditions, perspectives, practices, and products of the culture studied, including human commonalities as reflected in history, literature, and the visual and performing arts. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Linguistic Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparison of the language studied with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Comparisons: Cultural Comparisons: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparison of the target culture with their own. In classical language study, discussion and writing will be in English.

Connections: Students of modern and classical languages will use the target language to reinforce and expand their knowledge of other disciplines and to acquire new information and knowledge. In classical language study, discussion and presentations will be in English.

Communities: Students will use languages other than English within and beyond the school setting. Students of classical languages will recognize elements of classical languages and ancient cultures in the world around them, and they will share insights derived from their study of classical languages with others within and beyond the classroom setting.

Science

High School Earth and Space Science

High School Biology

High School Chemistry

High School Introductory Physics

High School Technology/Engineering

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Mathematics

Mathematical Practice

High School Content Standards by Conceptual Categories

Model Algebra I Content Standards [AI]

Model Geometry Content Standards [GEO]

Model Algebra II Content Standards [AII]

Model Mathematics I Content Standards [MI]

Model Mathematics II Content Standards [MII]

Model Mathematics III Content Standards [MIII]

Model Precalculus Content Standards [PC]

Model Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Content Standards [AQR]

Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language

Grades 11–12 Reading Standards for Literature [RL]

Grades 11–12 Reading Standards for Informational Text [RI]

Grades 11–12 Writing Standards [W]

Grades 11–12 Speaking and Listening Standards [SL]

Grades 11–12 Language [L]

Grades 11–12 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Studies [RCA-H]

Grades 11–12 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: Science and Career and Technical Subjects [RCA-ST]

Grades 11–12 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [WCA]

Grades 11–12 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas [SLCA]

Technology Education

Grades 9 – 12: Computing and Society (CAS)

Grades 9 – 12: Digital Tools and Collaboration (DTC)

Grades 9 - 12: Computing Systems (CS)

Grades 9 – 12: Computational Thinking (CT)

Social Studies

Standards for History and Social Science Practice – Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12

Demonstrate civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

2

Develop focused questions or problem statements and conduct inquiries. The ability to develop focused research questions in history/social science or define the dimensions of a particular policy problem is central to learning in these disciplines. Students learn that each field in the social sciences has its own ways of defining questions. For example, in studying the Great Depression, A political scientist might ask How did the major political parties, government institutions and the private sector respond?; An economist might ask What were the economic causes of the Depression?; A geographer might ask How did the Depression affect areas of the United States differently?; A historian might ask What related economic, political and social events preceded the Depression? This Standard corresponds to Writing Standard 7 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

3

Organize information and data from multiple primary and secondary sources. Student researchers gather and organize information from a variety of online, print, and other sources. In the history and social science fields, they pay close attention to whether the source is primary or secondary. Primary sources were created during the period under study (e.g., census data, a map, an interview, a speech, or an artifact such as a building, painting, or tool). Secondary sources are later interpretations or commentaries based on primary sources. Often students will use primary and secondary sources together to compose an argument, because each source provides a different type of information. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standards 1-3 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

4

Analyze the purpose and point of view of each source; distinguish opinion from fact. Students need to be exposed to readings that represent a variety of points of view in order to become discerning and critical readers. They need to be able to identify the purpose of a document and the point of view of its author. As students search primary sources for answers to questions such as What really happened in Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775?, they begin to understand that eyewitness accounts of the same event can differ. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

5

Evaluate the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source. Students investigating a question using online sources often find all too much material, some of it conflicting. The ability to be discerning and skeptical consumers of information is a crucial college, career, and civic skill. Beginning in elementary school, students should learn how and why to assess, verify, and cite sources. This Standard corresponds to Reading Standard 8 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

6

Argue or explain conclusions, using valid reasoning and evidence. The strength of an argument or explanation lies in its logical development of ideas, acknowledgement of counterclaims, and use of reliable supporting evidence. Effective arguments and explanations often go beyond text alone to include well-chosen and relevant visual elements such as photographs, maps, and displays of quantitative data. Students’ ability to adapt a presentation to the task, purpose, and audience and their ability to respond to questions are important skills for civic participation. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

7

Determine next steps and take informed action, as appropriate. One of the main goals of teaching history and the social science is to provide opportunities for students to practice using the knowledge and skills that enable them to participate in civic life. Some examples of those opportunities include: Exploring questions or problems in the form of classroom discussions, essays, research papers, and other products of research; Engaging in discourse about public policy beyond the classroom through social media, letters to the editor, oral presentations in public settings, or community service learning projects. This Standard corresponds to Writing Standards 1 and 2 and Speaking and Listening Standards 1-6 for Literacy in History and Social Science.

Literacy Standards for History and Social Science

Grades 11-12 Reading Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas: History/Social Science

Grades 11-12 Writing Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

Grades 11-12 Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy in the Content Areas

High School – United States History I

Origins of the Revolution and the Constitution – Supporting Question: How did events of the Revolutionary period inform the ideas in the Constitution?

Democratization and expansion – Supporting Question: How was the balance of Federal and state authority tested in the early Republic?

Economic growth in the North, South, and West – Supporting Question: How were the North, South, and West interdependent in the antebellum period?

Social, political, and religious change – Supporting Question: How did religious and ethical beliefs shape American reform movements?

The Civil War and Reconstruction: causes and consequences – Supporting Question: How did sectional differences over slavery in the North, South, Midwest, and West contribute to the Civil War?

Rebuilding the United States: industry and immigration – Supporting Question: Industrialists have been called “Captains of Industry” and “Robber Barons.” Which title is more appropriate for them and why?

Progressivism and World War I

High School – United States History II

The role of economics in modern United States history

Modernity in the United States: ideologies and economies – Supporting Question: How did the United States respond to new ideas about society?

Defending Democracy: Responses to fascism and communism – Supporting Question: What kind of a role should the U.S. play in world affairs?

Defending Democracy: the Cold War and Civil Rights at Home – Supporting Question: How did the U.S. government respond to challenges to freedom at home during the Cold War?

United States and globalization – Supporting Questions: How does globalization affect the United States? How can Americans use the Constitution to unite the nation?

High School – World History I

Dynamic interactions among regions of the world – Supporting Question: What kinds of global connections existed among humans in the past?

Development and diffusion of religions and systems of belief c. 500 BCE-1200 CE – Supporting Question: How did the development of religions and belief systems influence the political and cultural structures of the regions where they were produced?

Interactions of kingdoms and empires c. 1000-1500 – Supporting Question: How did the interactions of kingdoms and empires in this time period influence political, economic, and social developments?

Philosophy, the arts, science and technology c. 1200 to 1700 – Supporting Question: How did increasing global connectedness in the world lead to the developments in philosophy, arts and sciences in the early modern world?

Global exploration, conquest, colonization, c. 1492-1800 – Supporting Question: What was the effect of European conquests on the political and social structures of other regions of the world?

Philosophies of government and society – Supporting Question: How did philosophies of government shape the everyday lives of people?

High School – World History II

Absolute power, political revolutions, and the growth of nation states, c. 1700-1900 – Supporting Question: What are the similarities and differences of political revolutions in this period?

The Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions in Europe and social and political reactions in Europe – Supporting Question: In what ways did the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions bring improvements as well as new challenges in Europe and the United States?

The global effects of 19th century imperialism – Supporting Question: What factors led to European imperial ambitions?

The Great Wars, 1914-1945 – Supporting Question: What were the causes and consequences of the 20th century’s two world wars?

The Cold War Era, 1945-1991 – Supporting Question: How did the Cold War manifest itself in conflicts and shifting alliances in the second half of the 20th century?

The era of globalization 1991-present – Supporting Question: What are the factors that brought about globalization in the 21st century?

The politics of difference among people: conflicts, genocide, and terrorism – Supporting Question: How and why do people use difference to foment conflict?

High School Elective – United States Government and Politics

Building on knowledge from previous years, students should be able to:

Foundations of government in the United States – Supporting Question: How has the nation acted to narrow discrepancies between the founding ideals and reality?

Purposes, principles, and institutions of government in the United States – Supporting Question: How are the founding principles reflected in contemporary debates over the role of government?

Civil rights, human rights, and civil liberties – Supporting Question: How have court decisions defined the balance between broader national or community interests and the rights of the individual?

Political parties, interest groups, media, and public policy – Supporting Question: What are the roles of political parties, interest groups, and media in influencing public policy?

The relationship of the United States to other nations in world affairs – Supporting Question: How does the U.S. exercise power in world affairs?

High School Elective – Economics

Scarcity and economic reasoning – Supporting Question: How do individuals and corporations make choices about saving or spending?

Supply and Demand – Supporting Question: What factors affect the prices of goods and services?

Market structures – Supporting Question: What impact does competition have on businesses?

The role of government – Supporting Question: What is government’s responsibility in providing for social needs?

National economic performance – Supporting Question: What factors affect patterns of income distribution in the United States?

Money and the role of financial institutions – Supporting Question: Why are banks and stock markets regulated by the government?

Trade – Supporting Question: Why are the costs and benefits of trade agreements among nations?

High School Standards for Personal Financial Literacy

Earning and spending income – Supporting Question: What is the most important thing to look for in a job?

Saving money – Supporting Question: What can banks do for consumers?

Using credit and making investments – Supporting Question: What are the benefits and risks of using credit and investing?

Protecting and insuring assets – Supporting Question: How does an individual decide if insurance is worth its costs?

High School Standards for News/Media Literacy

Freedom of the press and news/media literacy – Supporting Question: Why does news/media literacy matter?

History of journalism – Supporting Question: How has journalism affected past and present society?

The challenges of news/media literacy in contemporary society – Supporting Question: How have developments in the Digital Age and in the structure of media organizations redefined what it means to be an informed participant in civic life?

Analyzing the news and other media – Supporting Question: How can individuals become informed consumers of news and media?

Gathering and reporting information, using digital media – Supporting Question: How do media literacy skills apply to generating news reporting and other content across all types of media?

Search Standards